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{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} Shāh Abbās the Great (or Shāh Abbās I; Persian: شاه عَباس بُزُرگ‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}‎; 27 January 1571 – 19 January 1629) was the 5th Safavid king (Shah) of Iran, and is generally considered the greatest ruler of the Safavid dynasty. He was the third son of Shah Mohammad Khodabanda.<ref>{{#invoke:Footnotes|harvard_citation_no_bracket}}</ref>

Although Abbas would preside over the apex of the Iranian Safavid Empire's military, political and economic power, he came to the throne during a troubled time for Iran. Under his weak-willed father, the country was riven with discord between the different factions of the Qizilbash army, who killed Abbas' mother and elder brother. Meanwhile, Iran's enemies, the Ottoman Empire (its arch rival) and the Uzbeks, exploited this political chaos to seize territory for themselves. In 1588, one of the Qizilbash leaders, Murshid Qoli Khan, overthrew Shah Mohammed in a coup and placed the 16-year-old Abbas on the throne. But Abbas was no puppet and soon seized power for himself.

With his leadership and the help of the newly created layers in his Iranian society, initiated by his predecessors but significantly expanded and completed under Abbas and composed of hundreds of thousands of Circassians, Georgians, and Armenians he managed to completely crush and diminish the power of the Qizilbash in the civil administration, royal house, the military, amongst all other positions. By this and his reforming of the army, it enabled him to fight the Ottomans and Uzbeks and reconquer Iran's lost provinces. By the 1603-1618 Ottoman War, he regained possession over Transcaucasia and Dagestan, as well as swaths of Eastern Anatolia and Mesopotamia; the latter two were territories which had been lost since the 1555 Peace of Amasya. He also took back land from the Portuguese and the Mughals, and expanded Iranian rule and influence in the North Caucasus, beyond the traditional territories of Dagestan. Abbas was a great builder and moved his kingdom's capital from Qazvin to Isfahan, making the city the pinnacle of Safavid architecture. In his later years, following a court intrigue involving several leading Circassians, the shah became suspicious of his own sons and had them killed or blinded.


Abbas I of Persia sections
Intro  Early years  Absolute monarch  Reconquest  The shah and his subjects  Contacts with Europe  Family tragedies and death  Character and legacy  Offspring  See also  Notes  Footnotes  References  Additional reading  External links  

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{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} Shāh Abbās the Great (or Shāh Abbās I; Persian: شاه عَباس بُزُرگ‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}‎; 27 January 1571 – 19 January 1629) was the 5th Safavid king (Shah) of Iran, and is generally considered the greatest ruler of the Safavid dynasty. He was the third son of Shah Mohammad Khodabanda.<ref>{{#invoke:Footnotes|harvard_citation_no_bracket}}</ref>

Although Abbas would preside over the apex of the Iranian Safavid Empire's military, political and economic power, he came to the throne during a troubled time for Iran. Under his weak-willed father, the country was riven with discord between the different factions of the Qizilbash army, who killed Abbas' mother and elder brother. Meanwhile, Iran's enemies, the Ottoman Empire (its arch rival) and the Uzbeks, exploited this political chaos to seize territory for themselves. In 1588, one of the Qizilbash leaders, Murshid Qoli Khan, overthrew Shah Mohammed in a coup and placed the 16-year-old Abbas on the throne. But Abbas was no puppet and soon seized power for himself.

With his leadership and the help of the newly created layers in his Iranian society, initiated by his predecessors but significantly expanded and completed under Abbas and composed of hundreds of thousands of Circassians, Georgians, and Armenians he managed to completely crush and diminish the power of the Qizilbash in the civil administration, royal house, the military, amongst all other positions. By this and his reforming of the army, it enabled him to fight the Ottomans and Uzbeks and reconquer Iran's lost provinces. By the 1603-1618 Ottoman War, he regained possession over Transcaucasia and Dagestan, as well as swaths of Eastern Anatolia and Mesopotamia; the latter two were territories which had been lost since the 1555 Peace of Amasya. He also took back land from the Portuguese and the Mughals, and expanded Iranian rule and influence in the North Caucasus, beyond the traditional territories of Dagestan. Abbas was a great builder and moved his kingdom's capital from Qazvin to Isfahan, making the city the pinnacle of Safavid architecture. In his later years, following a court intrigue involving several leading Circassians, the shah became suspicious of his own sons and had them killed or blinded.


Abbas I of Persia sections
Intro  Early years  Absolute monarch  Reconquest  The shah and his subjects  Contacts with Europe  Family tragedies and death  Character and legacy  Offspring  See also  Notes  Footnotes  References  Additional reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Early years
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