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Top, L-R: A soldier crawls on the ground during the Vietnam War; The Beatles, part of the British Invasion, change music in the United States and around the world Centre, L-R: John F. Kennedy is assassinated in 1963, after serving as President for three years; Martin Luther King Jr. makes his famous I Have a Dream Speech to a crowd of over a million; millions participate in the Woodstock Festival of 1969. Bottom, L-R: China's Mao Zedong puts forward the Great Leap Forward plan; the Stonewall Inn, site of major demonstrations for gay and lesbian rights; for the first time in history, a human being sets foot on the Moon, in the Moon landing of July 1969.
Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 19th century – 20th century21st century
Decades: 1930s 1940s 1950s1960s1970s 1980s 1990s
Years: 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969
1960s-related
categories:
BirthsDeathsBy country
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

The 1960s was a decade that began on January 1, 1960 and ended on December 31, 1969.<ref name="Zeitz">Joshua Zeitz "1964: The Year the Sixties Began", American Heritage, Oct. 2006.</ref> The term "1960s" also refers to an era more often called the Sixties, denoting the complex of inter-related cultural and political trends around the globe. This "cultural decade" is more loosely defined than the actual decade, beginning around 1963 and ending around 1974.<ref name="Barth84Exhaustion">John Barth (1984) intro to The Literature of Exhaustion, in The Friday Book.</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>


1960s sections
Intro  Overview  Politics and Wars  U.S. economics  Assassinations  Disasters  Social and political movements  Science and technology  Popular culture  People  Additional notable world-wide events  See also  References  Further reading  External links  

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Top, L-R: A soldier crawls on the ground during the Vietnam War; The Beatles, part of the British Invasion, change music in the United States and around the world Centre, L-R: John F. Kennedy is assassinated in 1963, after serving as President for three years; Martin Luther King Jr. makes his famous I Have a Dream Speech to a crowd of over a million; millions participate in the Woodstock Festival of 1969. Bottom, L-R: China's Mao Zedong puts forward the Great Leap Forward plan; the Stonewall Inn, site of major demonstrations for gay and lesbian rights; for the first time in history, a human being sets foot on the Moon, in the Moon landing of July 1969.
Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 19th century – 20th century21st century
Decades: 1930s 1940s 1950s1960s1970s 1980s 1990s
Years: 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969
1960s-related
categories:
BirthsDeathsBy country
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

The 1960s was a decade that began on January 1, 1960 and ended on December 31, 1969.<ref name="Zeitz">Joshua Zeitz "1964: The Year the Sixties Began", American Heritage, Oct. 2006.</ref> The term "1960s" also refers to an era more often called the Sixties, denoting the complex of inter-related cultural and political trends around the globe. This "cultural decade" is more loosely defined than the actual decade, beginning around 1963 and ending around 1974.<ref name="Barth84Exhaustion">John Barth (1984) intro to The Literature of Exhaustion, in The Friday Book.</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>


1960s sections
Intro  Overview  Politics and Wars  U.S. economics  Assassinations  Disasters  Social and political movements  Science and technology  Popular culture  People  Additional notable world-wide events  See also  References  Further reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Overview
<<>>