Actions

::Vitamin E

::concepts



{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} Vitamin E refers to a group of compounds that include both tocopherols and tocotrienols.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> Of the many different forms of vitamin E, γ-tocopherol is the most common form found in the North American diet.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> γ-Tocopherol can be found in corn oil, soybean oil, margarine, and dressings.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref><ref name=Traber /> α-tocopherol, the most biologically active form of vitamin E, is the second-most common form of vitamin E in the diet. This variant can be found most abundantly in wheat germ oil, sunflower, and safflower oils.<ref name=Traber /><ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> As a fat-soluble antioxidant, it stops the production of reactive oxygen species formed when fat undergoes oxidation.<ref name=sheet>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref name=Herrera>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> Regular consumption of more than 1,000 mg (1,500 IU) of tocopherols per day<ref name="GOVe">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> may be expected to cause hypervitaminosis E, with an associated risk of vitamin K deficiency and consequently of bleeding problems.


Vitamin E sections
Intro  Forms  Functions  Supplementation  Clinical applications  Toxicity  Dietary sources  Recommended daily intake  History  Vitamin E supplementation and cardiovascular disease  Notes  References  Further reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Forms
<<>>

Journal::title    Vitamin::vitamin    Pages::author    Volume::issue    First::align    Colspan::traber

{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} Vitamin E refers to a group of compounds that include both tocopherols and tocotrienols.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> Of the many different forms of vitamin E, γ-tocopherol is the most common form found in the North American diet.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> γ-Tocopherol can be found in corn oil, soybean oil, margarine, and dressings.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref><ref name=Traber /> α-tocopherol, the most biologically active form of vitamin E, is the second-most common form of vitamin E in the diet. This variant can be found most abundantly in wheat germ oil, sunflower, and safflower oils.<ref name=Traber /><ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> As a fat-soluble antioxidant, it stops the production of reactive oxygen species formed when fat undergoes oxidation.<ref name=sheet>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref name=Herrera>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> Regular consumption of more than 1,000 mg (1,500 IU) of tocopherols per day<ref name="GOVe">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> may be expected to cause hypervitaminosis E, with an associated risk of vitamin K deficiency and consequently of bleeding problems.


Vitamin E sections
Intro  Forms  Functions  Supplementation  Clinical applications  Toxicity  Dietary sources  Recommended daily intake  History  Vitamin E supplementation and cardiovascular disease  Notes  References  Further reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Forms
<<>>