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The Ellis Act is a provision in California Law (Government Code section 7060-7060.7<ref>CA Codes (gov:7060-7060.7)</ref>) that provides landlords in California with a legal way to "go out of business" short of selling the property to another landlord. It is named after Republican State Senator (1981-1988) James "Jim" L Ellis representing San Diego.

The Ellis Act "was adopted by the California Legislature in 1985 after the California Supreme Court ruled that landlords do not have the right to evict tenants to go out of the business of being a landlord".<ref>BeyondChron: San Francisco's Alternative Online Daily News » New Study Calls for Ellis Act Reform</ref>

Municipalities can regulate the Ellis Act eviction process to some extent. Those that do typically restrict the property from use as a rental property for a period of time and require that it go back under rent control provisions if it is returned to the rental market.

Tenant groups in San Francisco and Los Angeles claim that California landlords commonly misuse the Ellis Act "to bypass rent control"<ref>http://www.losfelizledger.com/article/evicted-residents-vow-to-keep-eye-on-building/</ref><ref>http://www.antievictionmappingproject.net/ellis.html</ref> and cash-in during peak housing market periods<ref>http://www.scpr.org/news/2015/04/24/51256/ellis-act-evictions-in-l-a-on-the-rise/</ref> by managing rent-stabilized properties to vacancy, after which they might demolish buildings to build pricey condominiums, retenant newly vacated units at top-market rents, or resell buildings at much higher prices than they bought once they are no longer value-encumbered by the presence of long-term, rent-stabilized tenants.



Ellis Act sections
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The Ellis Act is a provision in California Law (Government Code section 7060-7060.7<ref>CA Codes (gov:7060-7060.7)</ref>) that provides landlords in California with a legal way to "go out of business" short of selling the property to another landlord. It is named after Republican State Senator (1981-1988) James "Jim" L Ellis representing San Diego.

The Ellis Act "was adopted by the California Legislature in 1985 after the California Supreme Court ruled that landlords do not have the right to evict tenants to go out of the business of being a landlord".<ref>BeyondChron: San Francisco's Alternative Online Daily News » New Study Calls for Ellis Act Reform</ref>

Municipalities can regulate the Ellis Act eviction process to some extent. Those that do typically restrict the property from use as a rental property for a period of time and require that it go back under rent control provisions if it is returned to the rental market.

Tenant groups in San Francisco and Los Angeles claim that California landlords commonly misuse the Ellis Act "to bypass rent control"<ref>http://www.losfelizledger.com/article/evicted-residents-vow-to-keep-eye-on-building/</ref><ref>http://www.antievictionmappingproject.net/ellis.html</ref> and cash-in during peak housing market periods<ref>http://www.scpr.org/news/2015/04/24/51256/ellis-act-evictions-in-l-a-on-the-rise/</ref> by managing rent-stabilized properties to vacancy, after which they might demolish buildings to build pricey condominiums, retenant newly vacated units at top-market rents, or resell buildings at much higher prices than they bought once they are no longer value-encumbered by the presence of long-term, rent-stabilized tenants.



Ellis Act sections
Intro  References  

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