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Peace journalism has been developed from research that indicates that often news about conflict has a value bias toward violence. It also includes practical methods for correcting this bias by producing journalism in both the mainstream and alternative media, and working with journalists, media professionals, audiences, and organizations in conflict.

This concept was proposed by Johan Galtung.<ref>For example see the policy recommendations in the conclusion of: Galtung, J. & Ruge, M. (1965)</ref><ref>The Structure of Foreign News: The Presentation of the Congo, Cuba and Cyprus Crises in Four Norwegian Newspapers. Journal of Peace Research, 2, pp. 64–91.</ref> Other terms for this broad definition of peace journalism include conflict solution journalism, conflict sensitive journalism,<ref name="journalismethics.ca">Howard, R. (n.d.). Conflict Sensitive Journalism in Practice. Center for Journalism Ethics: School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Retrieved October 5, 2010.</ref> constructive conflict coverage,<ref>Kempf, W. (2003). Constructive Conflict Coverage. A Social Psychological Approach. Berlin: regener.</ref> and reporting the world.<ref>Reporting the World</ref>

War journalism is journalism about conflict that has a value bias towards violence and violent groups. This usually leads audiences to overvalue violent responses to conflict and ignore non-violent alternatives. This is understood to be the result of well documented news reporting conventions. These conventions focus only on physical effects of conflict (for example ignoring psychological impacts) and elite positions (which may or may not represent the actual parties and their goals). It is also biased toward reporting only the differences between parties, (rather than similarities, previous agreements, and progress on common issues) the here and now (ignoring causes and outcomes), and zero sums (assuming that one side's needs can only be met by the other side's compromise or defeat).<ref>Galtung, Johan, "On the role of the media in worldwide security and peace," In Tapio Varis (ed.), Peace and Communication, pp. 249–266, San Jose, Costa Rica: Universidad para La Paz.</ref>

Peace journalism aims to correct for these biases. Its operational definition is "to allow opportunities for society at large to consider and value non-violent responses to conflict".<ref name="Lynch, 2008, p.147">Lynch, 2008, p.147.</ref> This involves picking up calls for, and articulations of, non-violence policies from whatever quarter, and allowing them into the public sphere.


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{{#invoke:Message box|ambox}}

Peace journalism has been developed from research that indicates that often news about conflict has a value bias toward violence. It also includes practical methods for correcting this bias by producing journalism in both the mainstream and alternative media, and working with journalists, media professionals, audiences, and organizations in conflict.

This concept was proposed by Johan Galtung.<ref>For example see the policy recommendations in the conclusion of: Galtung, J. & Ruge, M. (1965)</ref><ref>The Structure of Foreign News: The Presentation of the Congo, Cuba and Cyprus Crises in Four Norwegian Newspapers. Journal of Peace Research, 2, pp. 64–91.</ref> Other terms for this broad definition of peace journalism include conflict solution journalism, conflict sensitive journalism,<ref name="journalismethics.ca">Howard, R. (n.d.). Conflict Sensitive Journalism in Practice. Center for Journalism Ethics: School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Retrieved October 5, 2010.</ref> constructive conflict coverage,<ref>Kempf, W. (2003). Constructive Conflict Coverage. A Social Psychological Approach. Berlin: regener.</ref> and reporting the world.<ref>Reporting the World</ref>

War journalism is journalism about conflict that has a value bias towards violence and violent groups. This usually leads audiences to overvalue violent responses to conflict and ignore non-violent alternatives. This is understood to be the result of well documented news reporting conventions. These conventions focus only on physical effects of conflict (for example ignoring psychological impacts) and elite positions (which may or may not represent the actual parties and their goals). It is also biased toward reporting only the differences between parties, (rather than similarities, previous agreements, and progress on common issues) the here and now (ignoring causes and outcomes), and zero sums (assuming that one side's needs can only be met by the other side's compromise or defeat).<ref>Galtung, Johan, "On the role of the media in worldwide security and peace," In Tapio Varis (ed.), Peace and Communication, pp. 249–266, San Jose, Costa Rica: Universidad para La Paz.</ref>

Peace journalism aims to correct for these biases. Its operational definition is "to allow opportunities for society at large to consider and value non-violent responses to conflict".<ref name="Lynch, 2008, p.147">Lynch, 2008, p.147.</ref> This involves picking up calls for, and articulations of, non-violence policies from whatever quarter, and allowing them into the public sphere.


Peace journalism sections
Intro  Origins  Necessity  Effects  Feedback loop  Response  Examples  Projects  Criticism  Similar approaches  Online resources  Organisations  See also  References  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Origins
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