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War on Women is an expression in United States politics used to describe certain Republican Party policies and legislation as a wide-scale effort to restrict women's rights, especially reproductive rights.<ref name="ACLU">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref name="huffpo1">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref name="Murkowski">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> Prominent Democrats such as Nancy Pelosi<ref name=Bendery>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> and Barbara Boxer,<ref name=Boxer>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> as well as feminists, have used the phrase to criticize proponents of these laws as trying to force their social views on women through legislation.<ref>Houston</ref><ref name=Zengerle>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref><ref name="IntntlWDaNOWCallEndWarWStmtPres">On International Women's Day NOW Calls for End to the "War on Women": Statement of NOW President Terry O'Neill (National Organization for Women), March 8, 2011, as accessed December 12, 2013 (probably press release).</ref><ref name=fiction/> The expression has been used to describe Republican policies in areas such as access to reproductive health services, particularly birth control and abortion services; the prosecution of criminal violence against women; the definition of rape for the purpose of the public funding of abortion;<ref name="Weigel" /><ref name="Crary">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> and workplace discrimination against women.<ref name="csmonitor">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref name="vawa">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref name="nytimesarizona">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref name="romneyirishtimes">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>

While used in other contexts, and prior to 2010,<ref name=NW_Angry/><ref name="Kirkus Book Reviews">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> it became a common expression in American political discourse after the 2010 congressional elections.<ref name="Atlantic" >The Atlantic: The GOP's Totally Reactive Reaction to the War on Women. Garance Franke-Ruta, August 2013.</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> The term is often used to describe opposition to the contraceptive mandate in Obamacare and policies to defund women's health organizations that perform abortions, such as Planned Parenthood.

The phrase and the concept have been criticized by Republicans and some pro-life Democrats.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus described it as an over-simplified fiction advanced by Democrats and the media<ref name=Caterpillars>K Jensen, Priebus Says Gender Battle Fictional as Caterpillar War [1] in Bloomberg</ref><ref name=SPI-050512>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> while other Republicans contended that such rhetoric was used as a distraction from President Barack Obama and the Democrats' handling of the economy.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref>[2]{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[dead link] }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[dead link] }}</ref> In August 2012, Todd Akin's controversial comments regarding pregnancy and rape sparked renewed media focus on the concept.<ref name="maxwell1">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[dead link] }}</ref><ref name="autogenerated1">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref name="cbslocal1">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> Republicans have tried to turn the phrase against Democrats by using it to argue hypocrisy for not critiquing sex scandals of members within their Party who have cheated, sexted, and harassed women; and for not supporting bills to combat sex-selective abortion.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


War on Women sections
Intro   Development of the term    Public opinion   Key political usage   Reaction    See also    References    Further reading   

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{{#invoke:Protection banner|main}}

War on Women is an expression in United States politics used to describe certain Republican Party policies and legislation as a wide-scale effort to restrict women's rights, especially reproductive rights.<ref name="ACLU">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref name="huffpo1">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref name="Murkowski">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> Prominent Democrats such as Nancy Pelosi<ref name=Bendery>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> and Barbara Boxer,<ref name=Boxer>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> as well as feminists, have used the phrase to criticize proponents of these laws as trying to force their social views on women through legislation.<ref>Houston</ref><ref name=Zengerle>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref><ref name="IntntlWDaNOWCallEndWarWStmtPres">On International Women's Day NOW Calls for End to the "War on Women": Statement of NOW President Terry O'Neill (National Organization for Women), March 8, 2011, as accessed December 12, 2013 (probably press release).</ref><ref name=fiction/> The expression has been used to describe Republican policies in areas such as access to reproductive health services, particularly birth control and abortion services; the prosecution of criminal violence against women; the definition of rape for the purpose of the public funding of abortion;<ref name="Weigel" /><ref name="Crary">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> and workplace discrimination against women.<ref name="csmonitor">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref name="vawa">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref name="nytimesarizona">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref name="romneyirishtimes">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>

While used in other contexts, and prior to 2010,<ref name=NW_Angry/><ref name="Kirkus Book Reviews">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> it became a common expression in American political discourse after the 2010 congressional elections.<ref name="Atlantic" >The Atlantic: The GOP's Totally Reactive Reaction to the War on Women. Garance Franke-Ruta, August 2013.</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> The term is often used to describe opposition to the contraceptive mandate in Obamacare and policies to defund women's health organizations that perform abortions, such as Planned Parenthood.

The phrase and the concept have been criticized by Republicans and some pro-life Democrats.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus described it as an over-simplified fiction advanced by Democrats and the media<ref name=Caterpillars>K Jensen, Priebus Says Gender Battle Fictional as Caterpillar War [1] in Bloomberg</ref><ref name=SPI-050512>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> while other Republicans contended that such rhetoric was used as a distraction from President Barack Obama and the Democrats' handling of the economy.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref>[2]{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[dead link] }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[dead link] }}</ref> In August 2012, Todd Akin's controversial comments regarding pregnancy and rape sparked renewed media focus on the concept.<ref name="maxwell1">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[dead link] }}</ref><ref name="autogenerated1">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref name="cbslocal1">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> Republicans have tried to turn the phrase against Democrats by using it to argue hypocrisy for not critiquing sex scandals of members within their Party who have cheated, sexted, and harassed women; and for not supporting bills to combat sex-selective abortion.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


War on Women sections
Intro   Development of the term    Public opinion   Key political usage   Reaction    See also    References    Further reading   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Development of the term
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