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{{#invoke:Multiple image|render}} The Satanic Verses controversy, also known as the Rushdie Affair, was the heated and frequently violent reaction of Muslims to the publication of Salman Rushdie's novel The Satanic Verses, which was first published in the United Kingdom in 1988. Many Muslims accused Rushdie of blasphemy or unbelief and in 1989 the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini of Iran issued a fatwa ordering Muslims to kill Rushdie. Numerous killings, attempted killings, and bombings resulted from Muslim anger over the novel.<ref>Jessica Jacobson. Islam in transition: religion and identity among British Pakistani youth. 1998, page 34</ref>

The Iranian government backed the fatwa against Rushdie until 1998, when the succeeding government of Iranian President Mohammad Khatami said it no longer supported the killing of Rushdie.<ref name="HttpquerynytimescomgstfullpagehtmlresFEDFFAACAE">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> However, the fatwa remains in place.

The issue was said to have divided "Muslim from Westerners along the fault line of culture,"<ref name="Pipes, 1990, p.133">Pipes, 1990, p.133</ref><ref>From Fatwa to Jihad: The Rushdie Affair and Its Aftermath By Kenan Malik, introduction, no page numbers</ref> and to have pitted a core Western value of freedom of expression—that no one "should be killed, or face a serious threat of being killed, for what they say or write"<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>—against the view of many Muslims—that no one should be free to "insult and malign Muslims" by disparaging the "honour of the Prophet" Muhammad.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> English writer Hanif Kureishi called the fatwa "one of the most significant events in postwar literary history."<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>


The Satanic Verses controversy sections
Intro  Background  Controversial elements of The Satanic Verses  Early reaction  [[The_Satanic_Verses_controversy?section={{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Fatwa_by_Ayatollah_Khomeini|{{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Fatwa by Ayatollah Khomeini]]  Social and political fallout  Reception timeline  See also  Notes  References  External links  

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Rushdie::title    Islamic::author    Fatwa::february    Pipes::satanic    Islam::muslims    Salman::khomeini

{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=EngvarB |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }}

{{#invoke:Multiple image|render}} The Satanic Verses controversy, also known as the Rushdie Affair, was the heated and frequently violent reaction of Muslims to the publication of Salman Rushdie's novel The Satanic Verses, which was first published in the United Kingdom in 1988. Many Muslims accused Rushdie of blasphemy or unbelief and in 1989 the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini of Iran issued a fatwa ordering Muslims to kill Rushdie. Numerous killings, attempted killings, and bombings resulted from Muslim anger over the novel.<ref>Jessica Jacobson. Islam in transition: religion and identity among British Pakistani youth. 1998, page 34</ref>

The Iranian government backed the fatwa against Rushdie until 1998, when the succeeding government of Iranian President Mohammad Khatami said it no longer supported the killing of Rushdie.<ref name="HttpquerynytimescomgstfullpagehtmlresFEDFFAACAE">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> However, the fatwa remains in place.

The issue was said to have divided "Muslim from Westerners along the fault line of culture,"<ref name="Pipes, 1990, p.133">Pipes, 1990, p.133</ref><ref>From Fatwa to Jihad: The Rushdie Affair and Its Aftermath By Kenan Malik, introduction, no page numbers</ref> and to have pitted a core Western value of freedom of expression—that no one "should be killed, or face a serious threat of being killed, for what they say or write"<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>—against the view of many Muslims—that no one should be free to "insult and malign Muslims" by disparaging the "honour of the Prophet" Muhammad.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> English writer Hanif Kureishi called the fatwa "one of the most significant events in postwar literary history."<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>


The Satanic Verses controversy sections
Intro  Background  Controversial elements of The Satanic Verses  Early reaction  [[The_Satanic_Verses_controversy?section={{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Fatwa_by_Ayatollah_Khomeini|{{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Fatwa by Ayatollah Khomeini]]  Social and political fallout  Reception timeline  See also  Notes  References  External links  

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