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{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} The Sappony or Saponi were a Native American people historically based in the Piedmont of North Carolina and Virginia. They spoke the Siouan Tutelo-Saponi language, related to the languages of the Tutelo, Occaneechi, Monacan, Manahoac and other eastern Siouan peoples. Reduced by disease and warfare, surviving members of the tribe migrated north to merge with other tribes. They disappeared from the historic record as a tribe by the end of the 18th century and were considered extinct as a tribe.

Since the late 20th century, certain groups in the Southeast have organized to assert their American Indian cultural identity; some claim descent from the historic Sappony. Among these are the Haliwa-Saponi, and the Occaneechi Band of the Sappony Nation of North Carolina, who took names referring to the historic tribe; and the Indians of Person County. Other Sappony bands are located in Ohio, Georgia and Texas.

None of these tribes has gained federal recognition. Federal tribal recognition grants to tribes the right to certain benefits, and requires documentation as regulated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) (with consultation by federally recognized tribes).


Sappony sections
Intro  Pre-Revolutionary history  Language  After the American Revolution  Organized tribes with state recognition  See also  References  External links  

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American::sappony    Carolina::north    Indian::tribes    Native::virginia    People::saponi    Tribe::cherokee

{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} The Sappony or Saponi were a Native American people historically based in the Piedmont of North Carolina and Virginia. They spoke the Siouan Tutelo-Saponi language, related to the languages of the Tutelo, Occaneechi, Monacan, Manahoac and other eastern Siouan peoples. Reduced by disease and warfare, surviving members of the tribe migrated north to merge with other tribes. They disappeared from the historic record as a tribe by the end of the 18th century and were considered extinct as a tribe.

Since the late 20th century, certain groups in the Southeast have organized to assert their American Indian cultural identity; some claim descent from the historic Sappony. Among these are the Haliwa-Saponi, and the Occaneechi Band of the Sappony Nation of North Carolina, who took names referring to the historic tribe; and the Indians of Person County. Other Sappony bands are located in Ohio, Georgia and Texas.

None of these tribes has gained federal recognition. Federal tribal recognition grants to tribes the right to certain benefits, and requires documentation as regulated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) (with consultation by federally recognized tribes).


Sappony sections
Intro  Pre-Revolutionary history  Language  After the American Revolution  Organized tribes with state recognition  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Pre-Revolutionary history
<<>>