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File:Senjinkun.jpg
Copy of the cover of the Senjinkin

The Instructions for the Battlefield (戦陣訓 Senjinkun?){{#invoke:Category handler|main}} was a pocket-sized military code issued to soldiers in the Imperial Japanese forces on 8 January 1941 in the name of then War Minister Hideki Tojo. <ref>Dear, The Oxford Companion to World War II , page 476</ref>It was in use at the outbreak of the Pacific War.

The Senjinkun was regarded as a supplement to the Imperial Rescript to Soldiers and Sailors, which was already required reading for the Japanese military. It listed a number of exhortations regarding military regulations, combat readiness, esprit de corps, filial piety, veneration of Shinto kami, and Japan's kokutai. The code specifically forbade retreat or surrender. <ref>Toland, The Rising Sun: The Decline and Fall of the Japanese Empire, page 512 </ref> The quote "Never live to experience shame as a prisoner." was repeatedly cited as the cause of numerous suicides committed by soldiers and civilians.

Japanese soldiers were instructed to “show mercy to those who surrender”. This was written in response to prior misconduct on the battlefield.<ref>Dower, War Without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War, page 26 </ref><ref>Gyokusai or “Shattering like a Jewel”: Reflection on the Pacific War</ref>

Towards the end of the war, copies of the Senjinkun were also distributed to the civilian population of Japan as part of the preparation for Operation Downfall, the expected invasion of the Japanese home islands by Allied forces.


Senjinkun military code sections
Intro  Excerpt from the Senjinkun introduction  Subsequent chapters  Related works  References  Notes  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Excerpt from the Senjinkun introduction
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File:Senjinkun.jpg
Copy of the cover of the Senjinkin

The Instructions for the Battlefield (戦陣訓 Senjinkun?){{#invoke:Category handler|main}} was a pocket-sized military code issued to soldiers in the Imperial Japanese forces on 8 January 1941 in the name of then War Minister Hideki Tojo. <ref>Dear, The Oxford Companion to World War II , page 476</ref>It was in use at the outbreak of the Pacific War.

The Senjinkun was regarded as a supplement to the Imperial Rescript to Soldiers and Sailors, which was already required reading for the Japanese military. It listed a number of exhortations regarding military regulations, combat readiness, esprit de corps, filial piety, veneration of Shinto kami, and Japan's kokutai. The code specifically forbade retreat or surrender. <ref>Toland, The Rising Sun: The Decline and Fall of the Japanese Empire, page 512 </ref> The quote "Never live to experience shame as a prisoner." was repeatedly cited as the cause of numerous suicides committed by soldiers and civilians.

Japanese soldiers were instructed to “show mercy to those who surrender”. This was written in response to prior misconduct on the battlefield.<ref>Dower, War Without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War, page 26 </ref><ref>Gyokusai or “Shattering like a Jewel”: Reflection on the Pacific War</ref>

Towards the end of the war, copies of the Senjinkun were also distributed to the civilian population of Japan as part of the preparation for Operation Downfall, the expected invasion of the Japanese home islands by Allied forces.


Senjinkun military code sections
Intro  Excerpt from the Senjinkun introduction  Subsequent chapters  Related works  References  Notes  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Excerpt from the Senjinkun introduction
<<>>