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I. Lewis "Scooter" LibbyUnknown extension tag "ref" (born August 22, 1950; first name generally given as Irve,Unknown extension tag "ref" sometimes Irving)<ref name="google">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> is an American former lawyer, former Democrat, a prominent Republican<ref name="nndb">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and former adviser to Vice President Dick Cheney.

From 2001 to 2005, Libby held the offices of Assistant to the Vice President for National Security Affairs and Chief of Staff to the Vice President of the United States<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and Assistant to the President during the administration of President George W. Bush.

In October 2005, Libby was indicted by a federal grand jury concerning the investigation of the leak of the covert identity of Central Intelligence Agency officer Valerie Plame Wilson.<ref name=HaydenInterview>"Transcript of General Hayden's Interview with WTOP", June 1, 2007</ref><ref name=Seidman>Joel Seidman, "Plame Was 'covert' Agent At Time of Name Leak", MSNBC.com, May 29, 2007; accessed June 10, 2007.</ref><ref name=TheClassifiedInformation>Neil A. Lewis, "Source of C.I.A. Leak Said to Admit Role"</ref> Plame's position at the CIA was considered classified information.<ref name="HaydenInterview"/> Libby was indicted on five counts relating to the Plame affair: Two counts of perjury, two counts of making false statements to federal investigators, and one count of obstruction of justice. Libby resigned all three government positions immediately after the indictment was announced.<ref name=indictment>"Indictment" in United States of America vs. I. Lewis Libby, also known as "Scooter Libby", United States Department of Justice, October 28, 2005; accessed December 10, 2007.</ref>

In the subsequent federal trial, United States v. Libby, the jury convicted Libby on four of the five counts in the indictment (one count of obstruction of justice, two counts of perjury, and one count of making false statements) and acquitted on the second count of making false statements.<ref name=Walsh>Kenneth T. Walsh, "A Rough Road For 'Scooter'? An Inside Player Takes Center Stage", U.S. News & World Report, October 31, 2005; accessed September 23, 2006.</ref><ref name=TheCounts>"I. Lewis Libby Jr. (Index): The Counts", The New York Times, Times Topics, updated periodically, March 6, 2007, accessed July 6, 2007.</ref> The day after his conviction in that trial, he resigned his later appointment as senior advisor at the Hudson Institute (January 1, 2006 – March 7, 2007).<ref name=HudsonInst/><ref name=Grieve>Tim Grieve, "The War Room: 'On Behalf of I. Lewis Libby'" ("Update"), Salon, May 31, 2007; accessed July 17, 2007.</ref>

Libby is the highest-ranking White House official convicted in a government scandal since John Poindexter, the national security adviser to President Ronald Reagan in the Iran–Contra affair (Poindexter's convictions were subsequently reversed on appeal in 1991).<ref name=APIndictments>See also: Associated Press, "A History of Indictments involving White House Staff", USA Today, October 26, 2007; accessed July 6, 2007.</ref>

On June 5, 2007, the presiding trial judge, Reggie B. Walton, sentenced Libby to 30 months in federal prison, a fine of $250,000, and two years of supervised release, including 400 hours of community service,<ref name=Coursonetal>Paul Courson, Brianna Keilar, Brian Todd, Jeffrey Toobin, and the Associated Press, "Libby Sentenced to 30 months in Prison", CNN.com, June 5, 2007</ref><ref name=ApuzzoYost>Matt Apuzzo and Pete Yost (Associated Press), "Libby Sentenced to 2½ Years in Prison", boston.com, June 5, 2007</ref><ref name=Merrittsent>See qualification in Jeralyn Merritt, "Scooter Libby: 30 Months in Prison, $250k Fine", TalkLeft (accredited press blog), June 5, 2007: "Note: CNN [in its television broadcasts and some online reports] erroneously reported that Libby's sentence included 2 years probation. In fact, it was supervised release, which is similar but different from probation, and replaced parole in the federal system in 1987."</ref><ref name=Merrittlife>Jeralyn Merritt, "Libby: Life on Supervised Release", TalkLeft (accredited press blog), July 5, 2007, accessed July 8, 2007. (Provides link to PDF of Judge Walton's "Judgment in a Criminal Case" in United States v. Libby, filed June 22, 2007, accessed July 8, 2007.)</ref> and then ordered Libby to begin his sentence immediately.<ref name=CNNJudge>"Judge Orders Libby Jailed during Appeal", CNN News, June 14, 2007, accessed July 8, 2007.</ref> On July 2, 2007, when Libby's appeal of Walton's order failed, President Bush commuted Libby's 30-month prison sentence, leaving the other parts of his sentence intact.<ref name=GWBWHP>George W. Bush, "Grant of Executive Clemency: A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America", The White House, July 2, 2007</ref><ref name=Chen>Edwin Chen, "Bush Commutes Libby's Prison Term in CIA Leak Case (Update 2)", Bloomberg.com, July 2, 2007, accessed July 2, 2007.</ref> In commuting Libby's prison term, Bush stated: "I am commuting the portion of Mr. Libby's sentence that required him to spend thirty months in prison. ... My decision to commute his prison sentence leaves in place a harsh punishment for Mr. Libby. The reputation he gained through his years of public service and professional work in the legal community is forever damaged."<ref name=GWBWHP/> After Libby paid his monetary fine and penalty totaling $250,400, Judge Walton queried aspects of the presidential commutation,<ref name=Merrittlife/><ref name=LewisRutenberg>Neil Lewis and Jim Rutenberg, "Libby Pays Fine; Judge Poses Probation Query", The New York Times, July 6, 2007</ref> and lawyers filed their briefs supporting Libby's serving supervised release, resolving the issue and thus clearing the way for Libby to begin the rest of his sentence, the two years of supervised release and 400 hours of community service.<ref name=Merrittagree>Jeralyn Merritt, "All Sides Agree Libby Should Serve Supervised Release", TalkLeft (accredited press blog), July 9, 2007; accessed July 10, 2007 (Provides links to PDF versions of the various legal briefs.)</ref><ref name=Lewisclear>Neil A. Lewis, "Issue of Supervised Release for Libby Is Cleared Up", The New York Times, July 10, 2007.</ref>

On December 10, 2007, Libby's lawyers announced that he would drop his appeal against his conviction in the case, leaving intact his remaining sentence and fine and leaving on his record his felony conviction, on condition of a full presidential pardon.<ref name=CBS>CBS, Libby Drops Appeal Of Spy Leak Conviction, December 10, 2007. ("Wells said he has not discussed a possible pardon with the president and does not know what Mr. Bush will do.")</ref> The next day, December 11, 2007, Bush issued 29 pardons but did not include Libby among them.<ref>Associated Press, "29 Convicts, None Named Libby, Receive Bush Pardons", The New York Times, December 12, 2007</ref><ref name=MerrittTimes>Jeralyn Merritt, "Bush Issues 29 Pardons, None for Scooter Libby", TalkLeft (accredited press blog), December 11, 2007; accessed December 13, 2007: "That doesn't mean one won't be forthcoming now that Libby has dropped his appeal. Bush has said previously he wouldn't give a pardon while the appeal was pending. Since Libby only announced his intent to withdraw the appeal yesterday [December 10, 2007], it could just be a matter of timing. Bush can grant pardons until he leaves office in 2009."</ref> As a consequence of his conviction in United States v. Libby, Libby's license to practice law was suspended by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in December 2007.<ref name=PADiscBoard>Listing for "Lewis Libby": "History", Search Facility, Disciplinary Board of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, accessed April 12, 2008.</ref> On April 3, 2007, the District of Columbia Bar suspended his license to practice law in Washington, D.C., and recommended his disbarment pending his appeal of his conviction.<ref name=DCBar>D.C. Bar – Find a Member search facility. Libby is listed in the general "name" search (erroneously) as "I L Lewis Libby Jr." and in hyperlinked documents as "I. Lewis Libby, Jr." Since 2007 he has been identified as "disbarred" and no longer a "member" of the D.C. Bar.</ref><ref name=DCBar2>The D.C. Bar revised its "Professional Rules of Conduct" on February 1, 2007, according to its "Bar News" section of its website; accessed June 5, 2007. On April 3, 2007, the District of Columbia Court of Appeals filed an "Order" ("In the Matter of I. Lewis Libby, Jr. ... Bar Registration No. 950758"), suspending Libby "immediately from the practice of law in the District of Columbia pending resolution of this matter [in United States v. Libby]", which the Office of Bar Counsel (D.C. Bar) received on April 4, 2007, directing it to "inform the Court if the matter is resolved without the necessity of further court action." In that order, "the Board directed the Bar Counsel to file a brief addressing whether [Libby's] crimes inherently involve moral turpitude." In its brief, filed on April 24, 2007, entitled "Statement of Bar Counsel", the D.C. Bar stated that his crimes amounted to "moral turpitude" and recommended to the District of Columbia Court of Appeals Board on Professional Responsibility that Libby "be disbarred pursuant to D.C. Code § 11-2503(a)", which reads (in pertinent part): "When a member of the bar of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals is convicted of an offense involving moral turpitude... the court shall, pending final determination of an appeal from the conviction, suspend the member of the bar from practice... If a final judgment of conviction is certified to the court, the name of the member of the bar so convicted shall be struck from the roll of the members of the bar and such person shall thereafter cease to be a member." Pursuant to the policy on "Moral Turpitude" contained therein, it is also noted (n. 4) that Libby's "disbarment should be deemed to commence, for reinstatement purposes, on April 11, 2007, the date that [he] filed an affidavit in compliance with D.C. Bar R. XI, § 14(g)." The brief lists Libby's admission to practice law in that jurisdiction as May 19, 1978. At that time Libby's lawyers filed notification of his intention to appeal his conviction within ten days after his sentencing with the D.C. Bar, an appeal that he subsequently decided to drop (Cf. Apuzzo's account of December 10, 2007, op cit)</ref> On March 20, 2008, after he dropped his appeal, he was disbarred by the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, in Washington, D.C., at least until 2012.<ref name=Leonnigdisbar>Carol D. Leonnig, "Court Disbars Cheney Ex-Aide: Libby Loses Right To Practice Law", The Washington Post, p. A2, March 21, 2008</ref>


Scooter Libby sections
Intro  Personal history  The Apprentice  Legal career  Government public service and political career  Involvement in the Plame affair  Indictment and resignation  Trial, conviction, and sentencing  The Wilsons' civil suit  Life after Conviction  In popular culture  See also  Footnotes  Notes  References  External links  

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{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

I. Lewis "Scooter" LibbyUnknown extension tag "ref" (born August 22, 1950; first name generally given as Irve,Unknown extension tag "ref" sometimes Irving)<ref name="google">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> is an American former lawyer, former Democrat, a prominent Republican<ref name="nndb">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and former adviser to Vice President Dick Cheney.

From 2001 to 2005, Libby held the offices of Assistant to the Vice President for National Security Affairs and Chief of Staff to the Vice President of the United States<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and Assistant to the President during the administration of President George W. Bush.

In October 2005, Libby was indicted by a federal grand jury concerning the investigation of the leak of the covert identity of Central Intelligence Agency officer Valerie Plame Wilson.<ref name=HaydenInterview>"Transcript of General Hayden's Interview with WTOP", June 1, 2007</ref><ref name=Seidman>Joel Seidman, "Plame Was 'covert' Agent At Time of Name Leak", MSNBC.com, May 29, 2007; accessed June 10, 2007.</ref><ref name=TheClassifiedInformation>Neil A. Lewis, "Source of C.I.A. Leak Said to Admit Role"</ref> Plame's position at the CIA was considered classified information.<ref name="HaydenInterview"/> Libby was indicted on five counts relating to the Plame affair: Two counts of perjury, two counts of making false statements to federal investigators, and one count of obstruction of justice. Libby resigned all three government positions immediately after the indictment was announced.<ref name=indictment>"Indictment" in United States of America vs. I. Lewis Libby, also known as "Scooter Libby", United States Department of Justice, October 28, 2005; accessed December 10, 2007.</ref>

In the subsequent federal trial, United States v. Libby, the jury convicted Libby on four of the five counts in the indictment (one count of obstruction of justice, two counts of perjury, and one count of making false statements) and acquitted on the second count of making false statements.<ref name=Walsh>Kenneth T. Walsh, "A Rough Road For 'Scooter'? An Inside Player Takes Center Stage", U.S. News & World Report, October 31, 2005; accessed September 23, 2006.</ref><ref name=TheCounts>"I. Lewis Libby Jr. (Index): The Counts", The New York Times, Times Topics, updated periodically, March 6, 2007, accessed July 6, 2007.</ref> The day after his conviction in that trial, he resigned his later appointment as senior advisor at the Hudson Institute (January 1, 2006 – March 7, 2007).<ref name=HudsonInst/><ref name=Grieve>Tim Grieve, "The War Room: 'On Behalf of I. Lewis Libby'" ("Update"), Salon, May 31, 2007; accessed July 17, 2007.</ref>

Libby is the highest-ranking White House official convicted in a government scandal since John Poindexter, the national security adviser to President Ronald Reagan in the Iran–Contra affair (Poindexter's convictions were subsequently reversed on appeal in 1991).<ref name=APIndictments>See also: Associated Press, "A History of Indictments involving White House Staff", USA Today, October 26, 2007; accessed July 6, 2007.</ref>

On June 5, 2007, the presiding trial judge, Reggie B. Walton, sentenced Libby to 30 months in federal prison, a fine of $250,000, and two years of supervised release, including 400 hours of community service,<ref name=Coursonetal>Paul Courson, Brianna Keilar, Brian Todd, Jeffrey Toobin, and the Associated Press, "Libby Sentenced to 30 months in Prison", CNN.com, June 5, 2007</ref><ref name=ApuzzoYost>Matt Apuzzo and Pete Yost (Associated Press), "Libby Sentenced to 2½ Years in Prison", boston.com, June 5, 2007</ref><ref name=Merrittsent>See qualification in Jeralyn Merritt, "Scooter Libby: 30 Months in Prison, $250k Fine", TalkLeft (accredited press blog), June 5, 2007: "Note: CNN [in its television broadcasts and some online reports] erroneously reported that Libby's sentence included 2 years probation. In fact, it was supervised release, which is similar but different from probation, and replaced parole in the federal system in 1987."</ref><ref name=Merrittlife>Jeralyn Merritt, "Libby: Life on Supervised Release", TalkLeft (accredited press blog), July 5, 2007, accessed July 8, 2007. (Provides link to PDF of Judge Walton's "Judgment in a Criminal Case" in United States v. Libby, filed June 22, 2007, accessed July 8, 2007.)</ref> and then ordered Libby to begin his sentence immediately.<ref name=CNNJudge>"Judge Orders Libby Jailed during Appeal", CNN News, June 14, 2007, accessed July 8, 2007.</ref> On July 2, 2007, when Libby's appeal of Walton's order failed, President Bush commuted Libby's 30-month prison sentence, leaving the other parts of his sentence intact.<ref name=GWBWHP>George W. Bush, "Grant of Executive Clemency: A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America", The White House, July 2, 2007</ref><ref name=Chen>Edwin Chen, "Bush Commutes Libby's Prison Term in CIA Leak Case (Update 2)", Bloomberg.com, July 2, 2007, accessed July 2, 2007.</ref> In commuting Libby's prison term, Bush stated: "I am commuting the portion of Mr. Libby's sentence that required him to spend thirty months in prison. ... My decision to commute his prison sentence leaves in place a harsh punishment for Mr. Libby. The reputation he gained through his years of public service and professional work in the legal community is forever damaged."<ref name=GWBWHP/> After Libby paid his monetary fine and penalty totaling $250,400, Judge Walton queried aspects of the presidential commutation,<ref name=Merrittlife/><ref name=LewisRutenberg>Neil Lewis and Jim Rutenberg, "Libby Pays Fine; Judge Poses Probation Query", The New York Times, July 6, 2007</ref> and lawyers filed their briefs supporting Libby's serving supervised release, resolving the issue and thus clearing the way for Libby to begin the rest of his sentence, the two years of supervised release and 400 hours of community service.<ref name=Merrittagree>Jeralyn Merritt, "All Sides Agree Libby Should Serve Supervised Release", TalkLeft (accredited press blog), July 9, 2007; accessed July 10, 2007 (Provides links to PDF versions of the various legal briefs.)</ref><ref name=Lewisclear>Neil A. Lewis, "Issue of Supervised Release for Libby Is Cleared Up", The New York Times, July 10, 2007.</ref>

On December 10, 2007, Libby's lawyers announced that he would drop his appeal against his conviction in the case, leaving intact his remaining sentence and fine and leaving on his record his felony conviction, on condition of a full presidential pardon.<ref name=CBS>CBS, Libby Drops Appeal Of Spy Leak Conviction, December 10, 2007. ("Wells said he has not discussed a possible pardon with the president and does not know what Mr. Bush will do.")</ref> The next day, December 11, 2007, Bush issued 29 pardons but did not include Libby among them.<ref>Associated Press, "29 Convicts, None Named Libby, Receive Bush Pardons", The New York Times, December 12, 2007</ref><ref name=MerrittTimes>Jeralyn Merritt, "Bush Issues 29 Pardons, None for Scooter Libby", TalkLeft (accredited press blog), December 11, 2007; accessed December 13, 2007: "That doesn't mean one won't be forthcoming now that Libby has dropped his appeal. Bush has said previously he wouldn't give a pardon while the appeal was pending. Since Libby only announced his intent to withdraw the appeal yesterday [December 10, 2007], it could just be a matter of timing. Bush can grant pardons until he leaves office in 2009."</ref> As a consequence of his conviction in United States v. Libby, Libby's license to practice law was suspended by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in December 2007.<ref name=PADiscBoard>Listing for "Lewis Libby": "History", Search Facility, Disciplinary Board of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, accessed April 12, 2008.</ref> On April 3, 2007, the District of Columbia Bar suspended his license to practice law in Washington, D.C., and recommended his disbarment pending his appeal of his conviction.<ref name=DCBar>D.C. Bar – Find a Member search facility. Libby is listed in the general "name" search (erroneously) as "I L Lewis Libby Jr." and in hyperlinked documents as "I. Lewis Libby, Jr." Since 2007 he has been identified as "disbarred" and no longer a "member" of the D.C. Bar.</ref><ref name=DCBar2>The D.C. Bar revised its "Professional Rules of Conduct" on February 1, 2007, according to its "Bar News" section of its website; accessed June 5, 2007. On April 3, 2007, the District of Columbia Court of Appeals filed an "Order" ("In the Matter of I. Lewis Libby, Jr. ... Bar Registration No. 950758"), suspending Libby "immediately from the practice of law in the District of Columbia pending resolution of this matter [in United States v. Libby]", which the Office of Bar Counsel (D.C. Bar) received on April 4, 2007, directing it to "inform the Court if the matter is resolved without the necessity of further court action." In that order, "the Board directed the Bar Counsel to file a brief addressing whether [Libby's] crimes inherently involve moral turpitude." In its brief, filed on April 24, 2007, entitled "Statement of Bar Counsel", the D.C. Bar stated that his crimes amounted to "moral turpitude" and recommended to the District of Columbia Court of Appeals Board on Professional Responsibility that Libby "be disbarred pursuant to D.C. Code § 11-2503(a)", which reads (in pertinent part): "When a member of the bar of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals is convicted of an offense involving moral turpitude... the court shall, pending final determination of an appeal from the conviction, suspend the member of the bar from practice... If a final judgment of conviction is certified to the court, the name of the member of the bar so convicted shall be struck from the roll of the members of the bar and such person shall thereafter cease to be a member." Pursuant to the policy on "Moral Turpitude" contained therein, it is also noted (n. 4) that Libby's "disbarment should be deemed to commence, for reinstatement purposes, on April 11, 2007, the date that [he] filed an affidavit in compliance with D.C. Bar R. XI, § 14(g)." The brief lists Libby's admission to practice law in that jurisdiction as May 19, 1978. At that time Libby's lawyers filed notification of his intention to appeal his conviction within ten days after his sentencing with the D.C. Bar, an appeal that he subsequently decided to drop (Cf. Apuzzo's account of December 10, 2007, op cit)</ref> On March 20, 2008, after he dropped his appeal, he was disbarred by the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, in Washington, D.C., at least until 2012.<ref name=Leonnigdisbar>Carol D. Leonnig, "Court Disbars Cheney Ex-Aide: Libby Loses Right To Practice Law", The Washington Post, p. A2, March 21, 2008</ref>


Scooter Libby sections
Intro  Personal history  The Apprentice  Legal career  Government public service and political career  Involvement in the Plame affair  Indictment and resignation  Trial, conviction, and sentencing  The Wilsons' civil suit  Life after Conviction  In popular culture  See also  Footnotes  Notes  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Personal history
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