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A Roots blower with two-lobed rotors. Most real Roots blowers' rotors have three or four lobes.
Key:
1 Rotary vane 1
2. Pump body
3. Rotary vane 2
a. Intake
b. Pumping
c. Forced air or air-fuel mixture into intake manifold

The Roots type supercharger or Roots blower is a positive displacement lobe pump which operates by pumping a fluid with a pair of meshing lobes not unlike a set of stretched gears. Fluid is trapped in pockets surrounding the lobes and carried from the intake side to the exhaust. It is frequently used as a supercharger in engines, where it is driven directly from the engine's crankshaft via a belt, chain, or gears.

It is named after the American inventors and brothers Philander and Francis Marion Roots, founders of the Roots Blower Company, Connersville, Indiana, who first patented the basic design in 1860 as an air pump for use in blast furnaces and other industrial applications. In 1900, Gottlieb Daimler included a Roots-style supercharger in a patented engine design, making the Roots-type supercharger the oldest of the various designs now available. Roots blowers are commonly referred to as air blowers or PD (positive displacement) blowers,<ref name="Roots Blowers">[1], Air Blower Services</ref> and can be commonly called "huffers" when used with the gasoline-burning engines in hot rod customized cars.<ref>Hot Rod Magazine's Street Machines and Bracket Racing #3 (Los Angeles: Petersen Publishing, 1979), p.65.</ref>


Roots-type supercharger sections
Intro   Applications    Technical considerations    Roots Efficiency map    Comparative advantages    Related terms    See also    References    External links   

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Roots::blower    Pressure::engine    Blowers::lobes    Rotor::boost    Commonly::which    Pumping::where

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A Roots blower with two-lobed rotors. Most real Roots blowers' rotors have three or four lobes.
Key:
1 Rotary vane 1
2. Pump body
3. Rotary vane 2
a. Intake
b. Pumping
c. Forced air or air-fuel mixture into intake manifold

The Roots type supercharger or Roots blower is a positive displacement lobe pump which operates by pumping a fluid with a pair of meshing lobes not unlike a set of stretched gears. Fluid is trapped in pockets surrounding the lobes and carried from the intake side to the exhaust. It is frequently used as a supercharger in engines, where it is driven directly from the engine's crankshaft via a belt, chain, or gears.

It is named after the American inventors and brothers Philander and Francis Marion Roots, founders of the Roots Blower Company, Connersville, Indiana, who first patented the basic design in 1860 as an air pump for use in blast furnaces and other industrial applications. In 1900, Gottlieb Daimler included a Roots-style supercharger in a patented engine design, making the Roots-type supercharger the oldest of the various designs now available. Roots blowers are commonly referred to as air blowers or PD (positive displacement) blowers,<ref name="Roots Blowers">[1], Air Blower Services</ref> and can be commonly called "huffers" when used with the gasoline-burning engines in hot rod customized cars.<ref>Hot Rod Magazine's Street Machines and Bracket Racing #3 (Los Angeles: Petersen Publishing, 1979), p.65.</ref>


Roots-type supercharger sections
Intro   Applications    Technical considerations    Roots Efficiency map    Comparative advantages    Related terms    See also    References    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Applications
<<>>