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{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} Edgar R.R. "Painless" Parker (1872–1952) was a flamboyant street dentist<ref name=Ephemeral>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> described as "a menace to the dignity of the profession" by the American Dental Association<ref name=ushistory>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and yet “much of what he championed – patient advocacy, increased access to dental care and advertising – has come to pass in the US.”<ref name=britannica>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> He attended Philadelphia Dental College<ref name=Cupertino>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> which would become Temple University dental school. After 6 weeks without a single patient, Parker decided to advertise. He hired one of P.T. Barnum’s ex-managers to help him take his practice on the road. He created the Parker Dental Circus, a traveling medicine show with his dental chair on a horse-drawn wagon while a band played. The band attracted large crowds and hid the moans and cries of patients who were given whiskey or a cocaine solution that he called “hydrocaine” to numb the pain.<ref name=Cupertino/> He charged 50 cents for each extraction and promised that if it hurt, he’d pay the patient $5.<ref name=britannica/>

At one point he claimed to have pulled 357 teeth in one day, which he strung on a necklace.<ref name=Cupertino/>

He legally changed his first name to "Painless", when he was accused of breaking a false advertisement law by claiming that his dentistry was truly painless.<ref name=Ephemeral/><ref name=Cupertino/>

When business thrived, he hired assistants and established a chain dentistry business.<ref name=Cupertino/> In the end, Parker ran 28 West Coast dental offices, employing over 70 dentists, and grossing $3 million per year.


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Parker::painless    Dental::dental    Teeth::american    First::title    Patient::category    Dentists::dentist

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{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} Edgar R.R. "Painless" Parker (1872–1952) was a flamboyant street dentist<ref name=Ephemeral>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> described as "a menace to the dignity of the profession" by the American Dental Association<ref name=ushistory>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and yet “much of what he championed – patient advocacy, increased access to dental care and advertising – has come to pass in the US.”<ref name=britannica>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> He attended Philadelphia Dental College<ref name=Cupertino>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> which would become Temple University dental school. After 6 weeks without a single patient, Parker decided to advertise. He hired one of P.T. Barnum’s ex-managers to help him take his practice on the road. He created the Parker Dental Circus, a traveling medicine show with his dental chair on a horse-drawn wagon while a band played. The band attracted large crowds and hid the moans and cries of patients who were given whiskey or a cocaine solution that he called “hydrocaine” to numb the pain.<ref name=Cupertino/> He charged 50 cents for each extraction and promised that if it hurt, he’d pay the patient $5.<ref name=britannica/>

At one point he claimed to have pulled 357 teeth in one day, which he strung on a necklace.<ref name=Cupertino/>

He legally changed his first name to "Painless", when he was accused of breaking a false advertisement law by claiming that his dentistry was truly painless.<ref name=Ephemeral/><ref name=Cupertino/>

When business thrived, he hired assistants and established a chain dentistry business.<ref name=Cupertino/> In the end, Parker ran 28 West Coast dental offices, employing over 70 dentists, and grossing $3 million per year.


Painless Parker sections
Intro  Media  Further reading  References  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Media
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