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Julian Ernest Chetvynde Rogers MBE (born 11 November 1947 in Barbados) is a Caribbean broadcaster and journalist, with more than 45 years' experience across the media landscape of television, radio and print:<ref name=Observer>"JR back in the saddle again", Observer News, 17 May 2010.</ref> he has worked as broadcast manager, TV and radio host and producer, publisher, trainer, lecturer, media consultant and public relations professional. Involved since the 1970s with the building of national radio stations notably in Barbados, St Kitts & Nevis, and Antigua & Barbuda, and part of "the original team set up to 'revolutionise' the media industry in Trinidad & Tobago with the rebranding of the Trinidad and Tobago Television Company (TTT) into CNMG",<ref name=TTExpress>Aabida Allaham, "Sell CNMG, says ex-journalist Cuffie", Trinidad Express Newspapers, 10 November 2010.</ref> he has been called "the Caribbean man"<ref>Antigua Sun, 15 March 2004.</ref> and has established a reputation as one of the region's most respected media practitioners.<ref>"Reflections of a Pioneer - The Observer Group", Business Focus (Antigua & Barbuda), Issue 21, December/January 2008, p. 18.</ref><ref>Caroline Popovic has written (St Lucia Star, 13 September 2000): "...without the likes of Ken Gordon in Trinidad, Ricky Singh and David de Caires from Guyana, Julian Rogers in Barbados, Ossie Clarke in Jamaica and Rick Wayne in St. Lucia, the populations of their respective countries would undoubtedly be living in a state of fear, a little like the Cubans, the Haitians and the Columbians. In those countries, local journalists either work for the government, live elsewhere, rot in jail or are buried in marked or unmarked graves.... Nothing must ever come in the way of a journalist and his right to publish. Least of all a government."</ref> His characteristic style as a broadcaster is to conduct biting interviews; one commentator refers to "the persistent journalistic exploits of a resurgent, sharp-witted and emphatic Julian Rogers".<ref>Rawlston Pompey, "Democracy and Democratic Rule", Caribarena, 19 April 2010.</ref>

Among initiatives in regional news-gathering and dissemination with which he has been associated, his TV talk show Talking Caribbean (1998–2000) – featuring hour-long interviews with guests ranging from politicians to entertainers – was "the Caribbean Broadcasting Union’s first attempt at live interactive television".<ref>"'Talk Caribbean' debuts on Monday", 10 July 1998.</ref> His live broadcasts continue to break new ground for Caribbean television and radio, as with his 2007 coverage of the Trinidad & Tobago general elections, "CNews - Campaign 41,"<ref>IslandMix, 11 May 2007.</ref><ref>"Campaign 41 launches", Allyuh.com, 4 November 2007.</ref> and his anchoring of the live broadcast covering the inaugural ceremony of the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ), which took place in Trinidad & Tobago in April 2005.<ref>"CCJ inauguration to be broadcast live", Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat, 12 April 2005.</ref> Additionally, in November 2010 his commentary at the state funeral of Barbadian Prime Minister David Thompson was among the applauded "outstanding contributions of famous media gurus" coordinated by Starcom Network.<ref>Peter Simmons, "JUST LIKE IT IS: Well done, Barbados", Nation News, 7 November 2010.</ref>


Julian Rogers sections
Intro  Biography  Controversy  Honours  Notes  External links  

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Julian Ernest Chetvynde Rogers MBE (born 11 November 1947 in Barbados) is a Caribbean broadcaster and journalist, with more than 45 years' experience across the media landscape of television, radio and print:<ref name=Observer>"JR back in the saddle again", Observer News, 17 May 2010.</ref> he has worked as broadcast manager, TV and radio host and producer, publisher, trainer, lecturer, media consultant and public relations professional. Involved since the 1970s with the building of national radio stations notably in Barbados, St Kitts & Nevis, and Antigua & Barbuda, and part of "the original team set up to 'revolutionise' the media industry in Trinidad & Tobago with the rebranding of the Trinidad and Tobago Television Company (TTT) into CNMG",<ref name=TTExpress>Aabida Allaham, "Sell CNMG, says ex-journalist Cuffie", Trinidad Express Newspapers, 10 November 2010.</ref> he has been called "the Caribbean man"<ref>Antigua Sun, 15 March 2004.</ref> and has established a reputation as one of the region's most respected media practitioners.<ref>"Reflections of a Pioneer - The Observer Group", Business Focus (Antigua & Barbuda), Issue 21, December/January 2008, p. 18.</ref><ref>Caroline Popovic has written (St Lucia Star, 13 September 2000): "...without the likes of Ken Gordon in Trinidad, Ricky Singh and David de Caires from Guyana, Julian Rogers in Barbados, Ossie Clarke in Jamaica and Rick Wayne in St. Lucia, the populations of their respective countries would undoubtedly be living in a state of fear, a little like the Cubans, the Haitians and the Columbians. In those countries, local journalists either work for the government, live elsewhere, rot in jail or are buried in marked or unmarked graves.... Nothing must ever come in the way of a journalist and his right to publish. Least of all a government."</ref> His characteristic style as a broadcaster is to conduct biting interviews; one commentator refers to "the persistent journalistic exploits of a resurgent, sharp-witted and emphatic Julian Rogers".<ref>Rawlston Pompey, "Democracy and Democratic Rule", Caribarena, 19 April 2010.</ref>

Among initiatives in regional news-gathering and dissemination with which he has been associated, his TV talk show Talking Caribbean (1998–2000) – featuring hour-long interviews with guests ranging from politicians to entertainers – was "the Caribbean Broadcasting Union’s first attempt at live interactive television".<ref>"'Talk Caribbean' debuts on Monday", 10 July 1998.</ref> His live broadcasts continue to break new ground for Caribbean television and radio, as with his 2007 coverage of the Trinidad & Tobago general elections, "CNews - Campaign 41,"<ref>IslandMix, 11 May 2007.</ref><ref>"Campaign 41 launches", Allyuh.com, 4 November 2007.</ref> and his anchoring of the live broadcast covering the inaugural ceremony of the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ), which took place in Trinidad & Tobago in April 2005.<ref>"CCJ inauguration to be broadcast live", Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat, 12 April 2005.</ref> Additionally, in November 2010 his commentary at the state funeral of Barbadian Prime Minister David Thompson was among the applauded "outstanding contributions of famous media gurus" coordinated by Starcom Network.<ref>Peter Simmons, "JUST LIKE IT IS: Well done, Barbados", Nation News, 7 November 2010.</ref>


Julian Rogers sections
Intro  Biography  Controversy  Honours  Notes  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Biography
<<>>