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Capitalization of "internet"

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Publishers have different conventions regarding the capitalization of Internet vs. internet, when referring to the Internet, as distinct from generic internets, or internetworks.

Since the widespread deployment of the Internet Protocol Suite in the early 1970s, the internet-standards-setting bodies and technical-infrastructure organizations, such as the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the Internet Society, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the W3C, and others have consistently spelled the name of the worldwide network, the Internet, with an initial capital letter and treated it as a proper noun in the English language; the Oxford English Dictionary notes that the global network is usually "the Internet", and most of the historical sources it cites use the capitalised form (in one case "the DARPA internet").<ref></ref> Before the transformation of the ARPANET into the modern Internet, the term internet in its lower case spelling was a common short form of the term internetwork, and this spelling and use may still be found in discussions of networking.

The spelling "internet" has become commonly used, as the word virtually always refers to the global network; the generic sense of the word has become rare.

In some of the first printed mentions of the Internet, like many other US government projects of the period it was referred to in all-caps as INTERNET, despite not being an acronym.<ref name="The History of the Internet, Typography Division, Cont’d">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


Capitalization of "Internet" sections
Intro  The Internet versus generic internets  Argument for common noun usage  Usage examples  References  External links  

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Internet::internet    First::title    Times::generic    Quote::common    Networks::spelling    Proper::network

Publishers have different conventions regarding the capitalization of Internet vs. internet, when referring to the Internet, as distinct from generic internets, or internetworks.

Since the widespread deployment of the Internet Protocol Suite in the early 1970s, the internet-standards-setting bodies and technical-infrastructure organizations, such as the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the Internet Society, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the W3C, and others have consistently spelled the name of the worldwide network, the Internet, with an initial capital letter and treated it as a proper noun in the English language; the Oxford English Dictionary notes that the global network is usually "the Internet", and most of the historical sources it cites use the capitalised form (in one case "the DARPA internet").<ref></ref> Before the transformation of the ARPANET into the modern Internet, the term internet in its lower case spelling was a common short form of the term internetwork, and this spelling and use may still be found in discussions of networking.

The spelling "internet" has become commonly used, as the word virtually always refers to the global network; the generic sense of the word has become rare.

In some of the first printed mentions of the Internet, like many other US government projects of the period it was referred to in all-caps as INTERNET, despite not being an acronym.<ref name="The History of the Internet, Typography Division, Cont’d">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


Capitalization of "Internet" sections
Intro  The Internet versus generic internets  Argument for common noun usage  Usage examples  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: The Internet versus generic internets
<<>>