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::Harrison v. NAACP

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Harrison v. NAACP, 360 U.S. 167 (1959), is a 6-to-3 ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States which held that the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia should have abstained from deciding the constitutionality of three barratry, champerty, and maintenance laws in the state of Virginia until state courts had had a reasonable chance to construe them.


Harrison v. NAACP sections
Intro   Background    Opinion of the Court    References    Bibliography    External links   

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{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

Harrison v. NAACP, 360 U.S. 167 (1959), is a 6-to-3 ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States which held that the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia should have abstained from deciding the constitutionality of three barratry, champerty, and maintenance laws in the state of Virginia until state courts had had a reasonable chance to construe them.


Harrison v. NAACP sections
Intro   Background    Opinion of the Court    References    Bibliography    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Background
<<>>