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::Symphony No. 9 (Schubert)

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The Symphony No. 9 in C major, D. 944, known as the Great (published in 1840 as “Symphony No. 7 in C Major”,<ref name="newperspective">http://www.daytonphilharmonic.com/content.jsp?articleId=1093 {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[dead link] }}</ref> listed as No. 8 in the Neue Schubert-Ausgabe<ref>http://www.schubert-ausgabe.de/index.php?article_id=8&clang=1&FORM%5Bgenre%5D=&FORM%5Bgenre2%5D=&FORM%5Border%5D=&FORM%5Bseite%5D=109&FORM%5Bdetail%5D=1088</ref>), is the final symphony completed by Franz Schubert. Originally called The Great C major to distinguish it from his Symphony No. 6, the Little C major,<ref>http://cso.org/uploadedFiles/1_Tickets_and_Events/Program_Notes/ProgramNotes_Schubert_Symphony_9.pdf</ref> the subtitle is now usually taken as a reference to the symphony's majesty. Unusually long for a symphony of its time, a typical performance of The Great takes around 55 minutes, though it can also be played in as little as 45 minutes by employing a faster tempo and not repeating sections as indicated in the score.


Symphony No. 9 (Schubert) sections
Intro  Composition and early reception  Numbering  Form  See also  Notes  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Composition and early reception
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The Symphony No. 9 in C major, D. 944, known as the Great (published in 1840 as “Symphony No. 7 in C Major”,<ref name="newperspective">http://www.daytonphilharmonic.com/content.jsp?articleId=1093 {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[dead link] }}</ref> listed as No. 8 in the Neue Schubert-Ausgabe<ref>http://www.schubert-ausgabe.de/index.php?article_id=8&clang=1&FORM%5Bgenre%5D=&FORM%5Bgenre2%5D=&FORM%5Border%5D=&FORM%5Bseite%5D=109&FORM%5Bdetail%5D=1088</ref>), is the final symphony completed by Franz Schubert. Originally called The Great C major to distinguish it from his Symphony No. 6, the Little C major,<ref>http://cso.org/uploadedFiles/1_Tickets_and_Events/Program_Notes/ProgramNotes_Schubert_Symphony_9.pdf</ref> the subtitle is now usually taken as a reference to the symphony's majesty. Unusually long for a symphony of its time, a typical performance of The Great takes around 55 minutes, though it can also be played in as little as 45 minutes by employing a faster tempo and not repeating sections as indicated in the score.


Symphony No. 9 (Schubert) sections
Intro  Composition and early reception  Numbering  Form  See also  Notes  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Composition and early reception
<<>>