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John Birks "Dizzy" Gillespie ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}}; October 21, 1917 – January 6, 1993) was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, composer and occasional singer.<ref>Watrous, Peter Dizzy Gillespie, Who Sounded Some of Modern Jazz's Earliest Notes, Dies at 75, The New York Times Obituary, January 7, 1993</ref>

AllMusic's Scott Yanow wrote, "Dizzy Gillespie's contributions to jazz were huge. One of the greatest jazz trumpeters of all time (some would say the best), Gillespie was such a complex player that his contemporaries ended up copying Miles Davis and Fats Navarro instead, and it was not until Jon Faddis's emergence in the 1970s that Dizzy's style was successfully recreated [...] Arguably Gillespie is remembered, by both critics and fans alike, as one of the greatest jazz trumpeters of all time."<ref>Yanow, S. (2002) All Music Guide to Jazz. Backbeat Books.</ref>

Gillespie was a trumpet virtuoso and improviser, building on the virtuoso style of Roy Eldridge<ref>To Be or Not to Bop: Memoirs of Dizzy Gillespie by Dizzy Gillespie and Al Fraser. Published: Doubleday, New York, 1979. Pages: 552</ref> but adding layers of harmonic complexity previously unheard in jazz. His beret and horn-rimmed spectacles, his scat singing, his bent horn, pouched cheeks and his light-hearted personality were essential in popularizing bebop.{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }}

In the 1940s Gillespie, with Charlie Parker, became a major figure in the development of bebop and modern jazz.<ref>Palmer, Richer. "The Greatest Jazzman of Them All? The Recorded Work of Dizzy Gillespie: An Appraisal" Jazz Journal, January 2001, p. 8</ref> He taught and influenced many other musicians, including trumpeters Miles Davis, Jon Faddis, Fats Navarro, Clifford Brown, Arturo Sandoval, Lee Morgan,<ref name="jmh">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Chuck Mangione,<ref name="cm">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and balladeer Johnny Hartman<ref name="jmh">http://johnnyhartmanbook.com/</ref>


Dizzy Gillespie sections
Intro  Biography  Style  \"Bent\" trumpet  Discography  Filmography  Bibliography  References  External links  

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use mdy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }}

John Birks "Dizzy" Gillespie ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}}; October 21, 1917 – January 6, 1993) was an American jazz trumpeter, bandleader, composer and occasional singer.<ref>Watrous, Peter Dizzy Gillespie, Who Sounded Some of Modern Jazz's Earliest Notes, Dies at 75, The New York Times Obituary, January 7, 1993</ref>

AllMusic's Scott Yanow wrote, "Dizzy Gillespie's contributions to jazz were huge. One of the greatest jazz trumpeters of all time (some would say the best), Gillespie was such a complex player that his contemporaries ended up copying Miles Davis and Fats Navarro instead, and it was not until Jon Faddis's emergence in the 1970s that Dizzy's style was successfully recreated [...] Arguably Gillespie is remembered, by both critics and fans alike, as one of the greatest jazz trumpeters of all time."<ref>Yanow, S. (2002) All Music Guide to Jazz. Backbeat Books.</ref>

Gillespie was a trumpet virtuoso and improviser, building on the virtuoso style of Roy Eldridge<ref>To Be or Not to Bop: Memoirs of Dizzy Gillespie by Dizzy Gillespie and Al Fraser. Published: Doubleday, New York, 1979. Pages: 552</ref> but adding layers of harmonic complexity previously unheard in jazz. His beret and horn-rimmed spectacles, his scat singing, his bent horn, pouched cheeks and his light-hearted personality were essential in popularizing bebop.{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }}

In the 1940s Gillespie, with Charlie Parker, became a major figure in the development of bebop and modern jazz.<ref>Palmer, Richer. "The Greatest Jazzman of Them All? The Recorded Work of Dizzy Gillespie: An Appraisal" Jazz Journal, January 2001, p. 8</ref> He taught and influenced many other musicians, including trumpeters Miles Davis, Jon Faddis, Fats Navarro, Clifford Brown, Arturo Sandoval, Lee Morgan,<ref name="jmh">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Chuck Mangione,<ref name="cm">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> and balladeer Johnny Hartman<ref name="jmh">http://johnnyhartmanbook.com/</ref>


Dizzy Gillespie sections
Intro  Biography  Style  \"Bent\" trumpet  Discography  Filmography  Bibliography  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Biography
<<>>