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::Lou Gehrig

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For the disease sometimes referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease, see Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
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Lou Gehrig
Lou Gehrig as a new Yankee 11 Jun 1923.jpg
First baseman
Born:
Yorkville, Manhattan. New York City
Died:
Riverdale, Bronx, New York City
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
June 15, 1923, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
April 30, 1939, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Batting average .340
Hits 2,721
Home runs 493
Runs batted in 1,995
Teams
Career highlights and awards
  • All-Star (19331939)
  • World Series champion (1927, 1928, 1932, 19361938)
  • AL MVP (1927, 1936)
  • Triple Crown (1934)
  • AL batting champion (1934)
  • 3× AL home run leader (1931, 1934, 1936)
  • AL RBI leader (1927, 1928, 1930, 1931, 1934)
  • Hit 4 home runs in one game on June 3, 1932
  • New York Yankees captain (1935–1939)
  • New York Yankees #4 retired
  • Major League Baseball All-Century Team
  • Major League Baseball All-Time Team
  • Member of the National
    Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
    Inducted 1939
    Vote Special Election (results unknown)

    Henry Louis "Lou" or "Buster"<ref name="nicknme">"Re-Discovering Lou Gehrig’s Lost Nickname". Retrieved February 15, 2012. </ref> Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941) was an American baseball first baseman who played 17 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees, from 1923 through 1939. Gehrig was renowned for his prowess as a hitter and for his durability, a trait which earned him his nickname "The Iron Horse". He was an All-Star seven consecutive times,<ref>"All-Star Game History". Baseball Almanac. 2007. Retrieved July 4, 2007. </ref> a Triple Crown winner once,<ref>[1] "Baseball-Almanac Statistics"</ref> an American League (AL) Most Valuable Player twice,<ref>[2] "Baseball-Almanac Statistics"</ref> and a member of six World Series champion teams. He had a career .340 batting average, .632 slugging average, and a .447 on base average. He hit 493 home runs and had 1,995 runs batted in (RBI). In 1939, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame<ref> National Baseball Hall of Fame, Lou Gehrig [3] Retrieved May 7, 2015 </REF> and was the first MLB player to have his uniform number retired.

    A native of New York City and attendee of Columbia University, Gehrig signed with the Yankees in 1923. He set several major league records during his career,<ref name="multiple">"Lou Gehrig". Britannica Encyclopedia. Retrieved April 16, 2008. </ref> including the most career grand slams (23) (since broken by Alex Rodriguez)<ref>"A-Rod sets slam record, Yankees beat Giants 5-1". Associated Press. Retrieved September 21, 2013. </ref><ref>"Lou Gehrig Grand Slams". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved April 16, 2008. </ref> and most consecutive games played (2,130), a record that stood for 56 years and was long considered unbreakable until surpassed by Cal Ripken, Jr. in 1995.<ref>"ESPN Classic - Iron Man Ripken brought stability to shortstop". Espn.go.com. Retrieved March 25, 2014. </ref> Gehrig's streak ended in 1939 after he was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disorder now commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease in North America.<ref>"Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)". Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Retrieved April 16, 2008. </ref> The disease forced him to retire at age 36 and was the cause of his death two years later. The pathos of his farewell from baseball was capped off by his iconic "Luckiest Man on the Face of the Earth" speech at the original Yankee Stadium.

    Gehrig was voted the greatest first baseman of all time by the Baseball Writers' Association in 1969,<ref>Frank Graham, Lou Gehrig: A Quiet Hero. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1969.</ref> and was the leading vote-getter on the Major League Baseball All-Century Team chosen by fans in 1999.<ref name=ESPN>"All-Century Team final voting". ESPN. October 23, 2007. Retrieved January 8, 2009. </ref> A monument in Gehrig's honor, originally dedicated by the Yankees in 1941, currently resides in Monument Park at Yankee Stadium. The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award is given annually to the MLB player best exhibiting his integrity and character.


    Lou Gehrig sections
    Intro  Early life  Major League career  Hall of Fame  Final years  Records, awards, and accomplishments  Film and other media  See also  References  External links  

    PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Early life
    <<>>

    Gehrig::baseball    Title::league    First::yankees    Major::april    Gehrig's::baseball    Leaders::records

    For the disease sometimes referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease, see Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
    </th></tr></th></tr>
    Lou Gehrig
    Lou Gehrig as a new Yankee 11 Jun 1923.jpg
    First baseman
    Born:
    Yorkville, Manhattan. New York City
    Died:
    Riverdale, Bronx, New York City
    Batted: Left Threw: Left
    MLB debut
    June 15, 1923, for the New York Yankees
    Last MLB appearance
    April 30, 1939, for the New York Yankees
    MLB statistics
    Batting average .340
    Hits 2,721
    Home runs 493
    Runs batted in 1,995
    Teams
    Career highlights and awards
  • All-Star (19331939)
  • World Series champion (1927, 1928, 1932, 19361938)
  • AL MVP (1927, 1936)
  • Triple Crown (1934)
  • AL batting champion (1934)
  • 3× AL home run leader (1931, 1934, 1936)
  • AL RBI leader (1927, 1928, 1930, 1931, 1934)
  • Hit 4 home runs in one game on June 3, 1932
  • New York Yankees captain (1935–1939)
  • New York Yankees #4 retired
  • Major League Baseball All-Century Team
  • Major League Baseball All-Time Team
  • Member of the National
    Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
    Inducted 1939
    Vote Special Election (results unknown)

    Henry Louis "Lou" or "Buster"<ref name="nicknme">"Re-Discovering Lou Gehrig’s Lost Nickname". Retrieved February 15, 2012. </ref> Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941) was an American baseball first baseman who played 17 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees, from 1923 through 1939. Gehrig was renowned for his prowess as a hitter and for his durability, a trait which earned him his nickname "The Iron Horse". He was an All-Star seven consecutive times,<ref>"All-Star Game History". Baseball Almanac. 2007. Retrieved July 4, 2007. </ref> a Triple Crown winner once,<ref>[1] "Baseball-Almanac Statistics"</ref> an American League (AL) Most Valuable Player twice,<ref>[2] "Baseball-Almanac Statistics"</ref> and a member of six World Series champion teams. He had a career .340 batting average, .632 slugging average, and a .447 on base average. He hit 493 home runs and had 1,995 runs batted in (RBI). In 1939, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame<ref> National Baseball Hall of Fame, Lou Gehrig [3] Retrieved May 7, 2015 </REF> and was the first MLB player to have his uniform number retired.

    A native of New York City and attendee of Columbia University, Gehrig signed with the Yankees in 1923. He set several major league records during his career,<ref name="multiple">"Lou Gehrig". Britannica Encyclopedia. Retrieved April 16, 2008. </ref> including the most career grand slams (23) (since broken by Alex Rodriguez)<ref>"A-Rod sets slam record, Yankees beat Giants 5-1". Associated Press. Retrieved September 21, 2013. </ref><ref>"Lou Gehrig Grand Slams". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved April 16, 2008. </ref> and most consecutive games played (2,130), a record that stood for 56 years and was long considered unbreakable until surpassed by Cal Ripken, Jr. in 1995.<ref>"ESPN Classic - Iron Man Ripken brought stability to shortstop". Espn.go.com. Retrieved March 25, 2014. </ref> Gehrig's streak ended in 1939 after he was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disorder now commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease in North America.<ref>"Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)". Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Retrieved April 16, 2008. </ref> The disease forced him to retire at age 36 and was the cause of his death two years later. The pathos of his farewell from baseball was capped off by his iconic "Luckiest Man on the Face of the Earth" speech at the original Yankee Stadium.

    Gehrig was voted the greatest first baseman of all time by the Baseball Writers' Association in 1969,<ref>Frank Graham, Lou Gehrig: A Quiet Hero. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1969.</ref> and was the leading vote-getter on the Major League Baseball All-Century Team chosen by fans in 1999.<ref name=ESPN>"All-Century Team final voting". ESPN. October 23, 2007. Retrieved January 8, 2009. </ref> A monument in Gehrig's honor, originally dedicated by the Yankees in 1941, currently resides in Monument Park at Yankee Stadium. The Lou Gehrig Memorial Award is given annually to the MLB player best exhibiting his integrity and character.


    Lou Gehrig sections
    Intro  Early life  Major League career  Hall of Fame  Final years  Records, awards, and accomplishments  Film and other media  See also  References  External links  

    PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Early life
    <<>>