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William M. "Boss" Tweed
William Magear "Boss" Tweed (1870).jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 5th district
In office
March 4, 1853 – March 3, 1855
Preceded by George Briggs
Succeeded by Thomas R. Whitney
Personal details
Born William Magear Tweed

New York City
Died
New York City
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Mary Jane C. Skaden
Profession Politician

William Magear Tweed (April 3, 1823 – April 12, 1878) – often erroneously referred to as William Marcy Tweed (see below),<ref>"William Magear Tweed (American politician) – Britannica Online Encyclopedia". britannica.com. Retrieved 2009-11-17. </ref> and widely known as "Boss" Tweed – was an American politician most notable for being the "boss" of Tammany Hall, the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in the politics of 19th century New York City and State. At the height of his influence, Tweed was the third-largest landowner in New York City, a director of the Erie Railroad, the Tenth National Bank, and the New-York Printing Company, as well as proprietor of the Metropolitan Hotel.<ref>Ackerman, p. 2</ref>

Tweed was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1852 and the New York County Board of Supervisors in 1858, the year he became the head of the Tammany Hall political machine. He was also elected to the New York State Senate in 1867, but Tweed's greatest influence came from being an appointed member of a number of boards and commissions, his control over political patronage in New York City through Tammany, and his ability to ensure the loyalty of voters through jobs he could create and dispense on city-related projects.

According to Tweed biographer Kenneth D. Ackerman:
It's hard not to admire the skill behind Tweed's system ... The Tweed ring at its height was an engineering marvel, strong and solid, strategically deployed to control key power points: the courts, the legislature, the treasury and the ballot box. Its frauds had a grandeur of scale and an elegance of structure: money-laundering, profit sharing and organization.<ref>Boss Tweed: The Rise and Fall of the Corrupt Pol Who Conceived the Soul of Modern New York New York: Carroll & Graf, 2005; quoted in Hammill, Pete, "'Boss Tweed': The Fellowship of the Ring" New York Times (March 27, 2005)</ref>

Tweed was convicted for stealing an amount estimated by an aldermen's committee in 1877 at between $25 million and $45 million from New York City taxpayers through political corruption, although later estimates ranged as high as $200 million.<ref name="gotham">"Boss Tweed", Gotham Gazette, New York, 4 July 2005.</ref> Unable to make bail, he escaped from jail once, but was returned to custody. He died in the Ludlow Street Jail.


William M. Tweed sections
Intro  Early life  Corruption  Scandal  Imprisonment, escape, and death  Evaluations   Middle name  In popular culture   See also   References  External links  

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</td></tr>
William M. "Boss" Tweed
William Magear "Boss" Tweed (1870).jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 5th district
In office
March 4, 1853 – March 3, 1855
Preceded by George Briggs
Succeeded by Thomas R. Whitney
Personal details
Born William Magear Tweed

New York City
Died
New York City
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Mary Jane C. Skaden
Profession Politician

William Magear Tweed (April 3, 1823 – April 12, 1878) – often erroneously referred to as William Marcy Tweed (see below),<ref>"William Magear Tweed (American politician) – Britannica Online Encyclopedia". britannica.com. Retrieved 2009-11-17. </ref> and widely known as "Boss" Tweed – was an American politician most notable for being the "boss" of Tammany Hall, the Democratic Party political machine that played a major role in the politics of 19th century New York City and State. At the height of his influence, Tweed was the third-largest landowner in New York City, a director of the Erie Railroad, the Tenth National Bank, and the New-York Printing Company, as well as proprietor of the Metropolitan Hotel.<ref>Ackerman, p. 2</ref>

Tweed was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1852 and the New York County Board of Supervisors in 1858, the year he became the head of the Tammany Hall political machine. He was also elected to the New York State Senate in 1867, but Tweed's greatest influence came from being an appointed member of a number of boards and commissions, his control over political patronage in New York City through Tammany, and his ability to ensure the loyalty of voters through jobs he could create and dispense on city-related projects.

According to Tweed biographer Kenneth D. Ackerman:
It's hard not to admire the skill behind Tweed's system ... The Tweed ring at its height was an engineering marvel, strong and solid, strategically deployed to control key power points: the courts, the legislature, the treasury and the ballot box. Its frauds had a grandeur of scale and an elegance of structure: money-laundering, profit sharing and organization.<ref>Boss Tweed: The Rise and Fall of the Corrupt Pol Who Conceived the Soul of Modern New York New York: Carroll & Graf, 2005; quoted in Hammill, Pete, "'Boss Tweed': The Fellowship of the Ring" New York Times (March 27, 2005)</ref>

Tweed was convicted for stealing an amount estimated by an aldermen's committee in 1877 at between $25 million and $45 million from New York City taxpayers through political corruption, although later estimates ranged as high as $200 million.<ref name="gotham">"Boss Tweed", Gotham Gazette, New York, 4 July 2005.</ref> Unable to make bail, he escaped from jail once, but was returned to custody. He died in the Ludlow Street Jail.


William M. Tweed sections
Intro  Early life  Corruption  Scandal  Imprisonment, escape, and death  Evaluations   Middle name  In popular culture   See also   References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Early life
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