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Herman Karl Lamm
File:Herman lamm mugshot.jpg
Born April 19, 1890
Kassel, German Empire
Died
Sidell, Illinois, United States
Cause of death
Other names
Occupation Former member of the Prussian Army
Known for
Criminal charge charge of Robbery {1914}; suspicion of hold up {1918}; arrested for burglary {1920}; arrested {1927};
arrested {1929}
Criminal penalty Imprisonment in 1917
Conviction(s) Grand Larceny

Herman Karl Lamm (April 19, 1890 – December 16, 1930<ref name="World War One Draft Card">World War One Draft Registration Card</ref><ref name="Sifakis">Sifakis, Carl (2001). The Encyclopedia of American Crime 2 (2 ed.). New York City, New York: Facts on File. p. 509. ISBN 0-8160-4634-4. </ref><ref name="Helmer">Helmer, William J.; Mattix, Rick (1998). Public Enemies: America's Criminal Past, 1919–1940. New York City, New York: Facts on File. p. 17. ISBN 0-8160-3160-6. </ref>), known as Baron Lamm, was a German bank robber. He is widely considered one of the most brilliant and efficient bank robbers to have ever lived, and has been described as "the father of modern bank robbery".<ref name="Diehl">Diehl, William (1991). The Hunt. Ballantine Books. p. 204. ISBN 0-345-37073-2. </ref> Lamm's techniques were studied and imitated by other bank robbers across the country, including the infamous John Dillinger.

A former Prussian Army soldier who immigrated to the United States, Lamm believed a heist required all the planning of a military operation. He pioneered the concepts of meticulously "casing" a bank and developing escape routes before conducting the robbery. Using a meticulous planning system called "The Lamm Technique", he conducted dozens of successful bank robberies from the end of World War I until 1930, when Lamm committed suicide when surrounded by a law-enforcement party in Sidell, Illinois, after a botched heist.<ref name="Rushville Republican">Rushville Republican. December 18, 1930. p. 1.  Missing or empty |title= (help)</ref>


Herman Lamm sections
Intro  Criminal career  Death  Legacy  References  

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</td></tr>
Herman Karl Lamm
File:Herman lamm mugshot.jpg
Born April 19, 1890
Kassel, German Empire
Died
Sidell, Illinois, United States
Cause of death
Other names
Occupation Former member of the Prussian Army
Known for
Criminal charge charge of Robbery {1914}; suspicion of hold up {1918}; arrested for burglary {1920}; arrested {1927};
arrested {1929}
Criminal penalty Imprisonment in 1917
Conviction(s) Grand Larceny

Herman Karl Lamm (April 19, 1890 – December 16, 1930<ref name="World War One Draft Card">World War One Draft Registration Card</ref><ref name="Sifakis">Sifakis, Carl (2001). The Encyclopedia of American Crime 2 (2 ed.). New York City, New York: Facts on File. p. 509. ISBN 0-8160-4634-4. </ref><ref name="Helmer">Helmer, William J.; Mattix, Rick (1998). Public Enemies: America's Criminal Past, 1919–1940. New York City, New York: Facts on File. p. 17. ISBN 0-8160-3160-6. </ref>), known as Baron Lamm, was a German bank robber. He is widely considered one of the most brilliant and efficient bank robbers to have ever lived, and has been described as "the father of modern bank robbery".<ref name="Diehl">Diehl, William (1991). The Hunt. Ballantine Books. p. 204. ISBN 0-345-37073-2. </ref> Lamm's techniques were studied and imitated by other bank robbers across the country, including the infamous John Dillinger.

A former Prussian Army soldier who immigrated to the United States, Lamm believed a heist required all the planning of a military operation. He pioneered the concepts of meticulously "casing" a bank and developing escape routes before conducting the robbery. Using a meticulous planning system called "The Lamm Technique", he conducted dozens of successful bank robberies from the end of World War I until 1930, when Lamm committed suicide when surrounded by a law-enforcement party in Sidell, Illinois, after a botched heist.<ref name="Rushville Republican">Rushville Republican. December 18, 1930. p. 1.  Missing or empty |title= (help)</ref>


Herman Lamm sections
Intro  Criminal career  Death  Legacy  References  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Criminal career
<<>>