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::Secession in the United States

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Secession in the United States properly refers to State secession, which is the withdrawal of one or more States from the Union that constitutes the United States; but may loosely refer to cleaving a State or territory to form a separate territory or new State, or to the severing of an area from a city or county within a State.

Threats and aspirations to secede from the United States, or arguments justifying secession, have been a feature of the country's politics almost since its birth. Some have argued for secession as a constitutional right and others as from a natural right of revolution. In Texas v. White, the United States Supreme Court ruled unilateral secession unconstitutional, while commenting that revolution or consent of the States could lead to a successful secession.

The most serious attempt at secession was advanced in the years 1860 and 1861 as eleven southern States each declared secession from the United States, and joined together to form the Confederate States of America. This movement collapsed in 1865 with the defeat of Confederate forces by Union armies in the American Civil War.Unknown extension tag "ref"

A 2008 Zogby International poll found that 22% of Americans believed that "any state or region has the right to peaceably secede and become an independent republic."<ref>"One in Five Americans Believe States Have the Right to Secede". Middlebury Institute. Retrieved September 16, 2015. </ref> A 2014 Reuters/Ipsos poll showed 23.9% of Americans supported their state seceding from the union if necessary; 53.3% opposed the idea. Republicans were somewhat more supportive than Democrats. Respondents cited issues like gridlock, governmental overreach, the Affordable Care Act and a loss of faith in the federal government as reasons for secession.<ref>"One in four Americans says they support seceding from the U.S.A. in wake of failed Scottish vote for independence". Daily Mail. Reuters. September 19, 2014. Retrieved September 16, 2015. </ref>


Secession in the United States sections
Intro  The American Revolution  Civil War era political and legal views on secession  Confederate States of America  Supreme Court rulings  Texas secession from Mexico  Partition of a state  1980s\u2013present efforts  Territory secession  Cultural reference  See also  Notes  Citations  References  External links  

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Title::states    States::first    United::state    Union::texas    Their::american    Which::right

Secession in the United States properly refers to State secession, which is the withdrawal of one or more States from the Union that constitutes the United States; but may loosely refer to cleaving a State or territory to form a separate territory or new State, or to the severing of an area from a city or county within a State.

Threats and aspirations to secede from the United States, or arguments justifying secession, have been a feature of the country's politics almost since its birth. Some have argued for secession as a constitutional right and others as from a natural right of revolution. In Texas v. White, the United States Supreme Court ruled unilateral secession unconstitutional, while commenting that revolution or consent of the States could lead to a successful secession.

The most serious attempt at secession was advanced in the years 1860 and 1861 as eleven southern States each declared secession from the United States, and joined together to form the Confederate States of America. This movement collapsed in 1865 with the defeat of Confederate forces by Union armies in the American Civil War.Unknown extension tag "ref"

A 2008 Zogby International poll found that 22% of Americans believed that "any state or region has the right to peaceably secede and become an independent republic."<ref>"One in Five Americans Believe States Have the Right to Secede". Middlebury Institute. Retrieved September 16, 2015. </ref> A 2014 Reuters/Ipsos poll showed 23.9% of Americans supported their state seceding from the union if necessary; 53.3% opposed the idea. Republicans were somewhat more supportive than Democrats. Respondents cited issues like gridlock, governmental overreach, the Affordable Care Act and a loss of faith in the federal government as reasons for secession.<ref>"One in four Americans says they support seceding from the U.S.A. in wake of failed Scottish vote for independence". Daily Mail. Reuters. September 19, 2014. Retrieved September 16, 2015. </ref>


Secession in the United States sections
Intro  The American Revolution  Civil War era political and legal views on secession  Confederate States of America  Supreme Court rulings  Texas secession from Mexico  Partition of a state  1980s\u2013present efforts  Territory secession  Cultural reference  See also  Notes  Citations  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: The American Revolution
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