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The presidential election campaign fund checkoff appeared on US income tax return forms as the question Do you want $3 of your federal tax to go to the Presidential Election Campaign Fund?

Originally $3 Tax Checkoff and implemented in the 1970s as an attempt at the public funding of elections, this money provides for the financing of presidential primary and general election campaigns and national party conventions. Beginning with the 1973 tax year, individual taxpayers were able to designate $3 Tax Checkoff to be applied to the Presidential Election Campaign Fund.<ref>See line 8, 1973 Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, Internal Revenue Service, U.S. Dep't of the Treasury.</ref> Both the Republican and Democratic nominees in the general election receive a fixed amount of checkoff dollars. Nominees from other political parties may qualify for a smaller, proportionate amount of checkoff funds if they receive over five percent of the vote. The national parties also receive funds to cover the costs of their national conventions. Matching funds are also given for primary candidates for small contributions. The campaign fund reduces a candidate's dependence on large contributions from individuals and special-interest groups. This program is administered by the Federal Election Commission (FEC).

Requirements to be declared eligible include agreeing to an overall spending limit, abiding by spending limits in each state, using public funds only for legitimate campaign-related expenses, keeping financial records and permitting an extensive campaign audit.

Checking the box does not change the amount of an individual's tax or refund. The $3 is paid by the government. In other words, checking the box causes the federal government to receive $3 less in tax revenue for other spending, than if one hadn't checked the box.


Presidential election campaign fund checkoff sections
Intro  Primary election  General election  Convention funding  Related legislation  See also  Notes  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Primary election
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The presidential election campaign fund checkoff appeared on US income tax return forms as the question Do you want $3 of your federal tax to go to the Presidential Election Campaign Fund?

Originally $1 and implemented in the 1970s as an attempt at the public funding of elections, this money provides for the financing of presidential primary and general election campaigns and national party conventions. Beginning with the 1973 tax year, individual taxpayers were able to designate $1 to be applied to the Presidential Election Campaign Fund.<ref>See line 8, 1973 Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, Internal Revenue Service, U.S. Dep't of the Treasury.</ref> Both the Republican and Democratic nominees in the general election receive a fixed amount of checkoff dollars. Nominees from other political parties may qualify for a smaller, proportionate amount of checkoff funds if they receive over five percent of the vote. The national parties also receive funds to cover the costs of their national conventions. Matching funds are also given for primary candidates for small contributions. The campaign fund reduces a candidate's dependence on large contributions from individuals and special-interest groups. This program is administered by the Federal Election Commission (FEC).

Requirements to be declared eligible include agreeing to an overall spending limit, abiding by spending limits in each state, using public funds only for legitimate campaign-related expenses, keeping financial records and permitting an extensive campaign audit.

Checking the box does not change the amount of an individual's tax or refund. The $3 is paid by the government. In other words, checking the box causes the federal government to receive $3 less in tax revenue for other spending, than if one hadn't checked the box.


Presidential election campaign fund checkoff sections
Intro  Primary election  General election  Convention funding  Related legislation  See also  Notes  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Primary election
<<>>