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The Australian one hundred dollar banknote was first issued, as a paper note, in 1984.<ref name=rba-other-notes>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> There have been only two different issues of this denomination: initially a greyish blue paper note, and from May 1996, a green polymer note.<ref name=rba-mus-polymer>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> There were 221,842,984 paper notes issued before its withdrawal.{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }}

According to Reserve Bank of Australia statistics, the number of $100 note (Australian)00 banknotes in circulation in June 2005 was 149 million, or 18.5% of all notes in circulation. The cash value for these notes was $100 note (Australian)4,924 million, or 41.9% of the total value for all denominations. Only the $50 note had more cash value in circulation. Updated figures to June 2008 were 176.9 million, or 19%, and $100 note (Australian)7,690,000,000, or 42.1%. Again, the value of cash in circulation is more for the $50 note.<ref>Notes on Issue, www.rba.gov.au, Data updated to end June 2008, Reserve Bank of Australia. Retrieved on 4 August 2015.</ref> This can be explained by the fact that most automated teller machines dispense $20 and $50 notes, but not $100 note (Australian)00 notes.

As of June 2014, 270 million $100 note (Australian)00 notes were in circulation, 21% of the total notes in circulation; worth $27,024 million, or 45% of the total value for all denominations.<ref name=rba-stats-100>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>

Since the start of issuance there have been six signature combinations. Two other combinations were not issued.{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }}

Since 1973, the main title identifying the country on banknotes has been "Australia". The denominations issued prior to 1973 used "Commonwealth of Australia".{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }}


Australian one hundred-dollar note sections
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{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Refimprove |date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Message box|ambox}} }} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

The Australian one hundred dollar banknote was first issued, as a paper note, in 1984.<ref name=rba-other-notes>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> There have been only two different issues of this denomination: initially a greyish blue paper note, and from May 1996, a green polymer note.<ref name=rba-mus-polymer>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> There were 221,842,984 paper notes issued before its withdrawal.{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }}

According to Reserve Bank of Australia statistics, the number of $100 banknotes in circulation in June 2005 was 149 million, or 18.5% of all notes in circulation. The cash value for these notes was $14,924 million, or 41.9% of the total value for all denominations. Only the $50 note had more cash value in circulation. Updated figures to June 2008 were 176.9 million, or 19%, and $17,690,000,000, or 42.1%. Again, the value of cash in circulation is more for the $50 note.<ref>Notes on Issue, www.rba.gov.au, Data updated to end June 2008, Reserve Bank of Australia. Retrieved on 4 August 2015.</ref> This can be explained by the fact that most automated teller machines dispense $20 and $50 notes, but not $100 notes.

As of June 2014, 270 million $100 notes were in circulation, 21% of the total notes in circulation; worth $27,024 million, or 45% of the total value for all denominations.<ref name=rba-stats-100>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>

Since the start of issuance there have been six signature combinations. Two other combinations were not issued.{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }}

Since 1973, the main title identifying the country on banknotes has been "Australia". The denominations issued prior to 1973 used "Commonwealth of Australia".{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }}


Australian one hundred-dollar note sections
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