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The ǀXam<ref>ǀXam rather than ǃXam is the correct spelling - see Barnard, A. 1992. Hunters and herders of Southern Africa: a comparative ethnography of the Khoisan peoples. Cambridge University Press.</ref><ref>Bleek, W.H.I. & Lloyd, L.C. 1911. Specimens of Bushman Folklore. London: George Allen.</ref><ref>Deacon, J. 1986. 'My place is the Bitterpits'. The home territory of the Bleek and Lloyd's |Xam San informants. African Studies 45: 135-155.</ref><ref>Deacon, J. 1994. Rock engravings and the folklore of Bleek and Lloyd's ǀXam San informants. In T. A. Dowson, & Lewis-Williams, J.D. (ed.). Contested images: diversity in southern African rock art research, pp. 237-256. Johannesburg: Witwatersrand University Press.</ref><ref>Lewis-Williams, J. D. 2000. Stories that float from afar: ancestral folklore of the San of Southern Africa. Cape Town: David Philip.</ref><ref>Skotnes, P. 2007.Claim to the country: the archive of Lucy Lloyd and Wilhelm Bleek. Johannesburg: Jacana</ref> and ǂKhomani heartland tentative World Heritage Site, consists of regions located to the south and north of Upington, respectively, in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa. The ǀXam and ǂKhomani (more correctly Nǁnǂe) people were linguistically related groups of San (Bushman) people, their respective languages (ǀXam and ǂKhomani) being part of the ǃKwi language group. Descendants of both the ǀXam and Nǁnǂe include Afrikaans-speaking ‘Coloured’ people on farms or in towns in the region amongst whom the precolonial languages are either entirely extinct (in the case of ǀXam) or can be spoken by but a very few people (in the case of Nǁnǂe).


ǀXam and ǂKhomani heartland sections
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Khomani::people    World::heritage    Deacon::unesco    Africa::bleek    Language::south    Southern::north

The ǀXam<ref>ǀXam rather than ǃXam is the correct spelling - see Barnard, A. 1992. Hunters and herders of Southern Africa: a comparative ethnography of the Khoisan peoples. Cambridge University Press.</ref><ref>Bleek, W.H.I. & Lloyd, L.C. 1911. Specimens of Bushman Folklore. London: George Allen.</ref><ref>Deacon, J. 1986. 'My place is the Bitterpits'. The home territory of the Bleek and Lloyd's |Xam San informants. African Studies 45: 135-155.</ref><ref>Deacon, J. 1994. Rock engravings and the folklore of Bleek and Lloyd's ǀXam San informants. In T. A. Dowson, & Lewis-Williams, J.D. (ed.). Contested images: diversity in southern African rock art research, pp. 237-256. Johannesburg: Witwatersrand University Press.</ref><ref>Lewis-Williams, J. D. 2000. Stories that float from afar: ancestral folklore of the San of Southern Africa. Cape Town: David Philip.</ref><ref>Skotnes, P. 2007.Claim to the country: the archive of Lucy Lloyd and Wilhelm Bleek. Johannesburg: Jacana</ref> and ǂKhomani heartland tentative World Heritage Site, consists of regions located to the south and north of Upington, respectively, in the Northern Cape Province of South Africa. The ǀXam and ǂKhomani (more correctly Nǁnǂe) people were linguistically related groups of San (Bushman) people, their respective languages (ǀXam and ǂKhomani) being part of the ǃKwi language group. Descendants of both the ǀXam and Nǁnǂe include Afrikaans-speaking ‘Coloured’ people on farms or in towns in the region amongst whom the precolonial languages are either entirely extinct (in the case of ǀXam) or can be spoken by but a very few people (in the case of Nǁnǂe).


ǀXam and ǂKhomani heartland sections
Intro  Site description  World Heritage Status   Notes    References   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Site description
<<>>