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::Sekele language

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Sekele
Northern ǃXuun
Vasekela
Native to Namibia, Angola
Region Okavango and Ovamboland Territory
Native speakers
(this article does not contain any information regarding the number of speakers)<ref>The numbers in Ethnologue add up to far more than the ~16,000 for all !Kung in Brenzinger (2011), even ignoring the spurious numbers for this entry</ref>
Kx'a
Language codes
ISO 639-3 vaj
Glottolog oung1238Unknown extension tag "ref"

Sekele (Vasekele, the Angolan Bantu name), or Northern ǃXuun (Northern Ju); also known by the outdated term ǃʼOǃKung (ǃʼO ǃuŋ,

  1. REDIRECT
  • This is a redirect from a title that potentially could be expanded into a new article or other type of associated Wikipedia page. The topic described by this title is more detailed than what is currently provided on the target page, or section of that page. For more information follow the bold category link.
    • When the target page becomes too large, this redirect may be replaced with a page carved out of the target page. See also {{R to section}}, and when appropriate, use both together.
    • If the topic is not susceptible to a major expansion, then instead of this rcat, tag this redirect with {{R to section}} or {{R to list entry}} as applicable.
    • Do not replace links to this redirect with a link directly to the target page.) "Forest ǃKung" and in one source as Maligo (Sekele Maligo), is the northern variety of the !Kung (ǃXuun) dialect continuum. It was widespread in southern Angola before the civil war, but now is principally spoken among a diaspora in northern Namibia.

A variety currently being investigated is Mangetti Dune !Kung, spoken by a resettled diaspora community of 500–1000 in Namibia and South Africa in the settlements of Mangetti Dune and Omtaku (Omatako?), east of Grootfontein, Namibia, halfway to the Botswana border; and in Schmidtsdrif, west of Kimberley, South Africa.


Sekele language sections
Intro  Phonology  References  External links  

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Namibia::angola    Mangetti::south    Africa::language    Clicks::category    Palatal::diaspora    Lateral::sekele

Sekele
Northern ǃXuun
Vasekela
Native to Namibia, Angola
Region Okavango and Ovamboland Territory
Native speakers
(this article does not contain any information regarding the number of speakers)<ref>The numbers in Ethnologue add up to far more than the ~16,000 for all !Kung in Brenzinger (2011), even ignoring the spurious numbers for this entry</ref>
Kx'a
Language codes
ISO 639-3 vaj
Glottolog oung1238Unknown extension tag "ref"

Sekele (Vasekele, the Angolan Bantu name), or Northern ǃXuun (Northern Ju); also known by the outdated term ǃʼOǃKung (ǃʼO ǃuŋ,

  1. REDIRECT
  • This is a redirect from a title that potentially could be expanded into a new article or other type of associated Wikipedia page. The topic described by this title is more detailed than what is currently provided on the target page, or section of that page. For more information follow the bold category link.
    • When the target page becomes too large, this redirect may be replaced with a page carved out of the target page. See also {{R to section}}, and when appropriate, use both together.
    • If the topic is not susceptible to a major expansion, then instead of this rcat, tag this redirect with {{R to section}} or {{R to list entry}} as applicable.
    • Do not replace links to this redirect with a link directly to the target page.) "Forest ǃKung" and in one source as Maligo (Sekele Maligo), is the northern variety of the !Kung (ǃXuun) dialect continuum. It was widespread in southern Angola before the civil war, but now is principally spoken among a diaspora in northern Namibia.

A variety currently being investigated is Mangetti Dune !Kung, spoken by a resettled diaspora community of 500–1000 in Namibia and South Africa in the settlements of Mangetti Dune and Omtaku (Omatako?), east of Grootfontein, Namibia, halfway to the Botswana border; and in Schmidtsdrif, west of Kimberley, South Africa.


Sekele language sections
Intro  Phonology  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Phonology
<<>>